OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, August 04, 1914, LAST EDITION, Image 12

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1914-08-04/ed-1/seq-12/

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sequent loss mlghffegual the prior
gain."
CHARLES ROHE,
Largest New York Provision Packer.
"A few lines may benefit, but great
damage would occur to business.
The first direct effect will be to send
up meat prices. We already import
from Argentina. Conditions will be
chaotic and all suffer."
U. S. SENATOR ROBERT OWEN,
Chafrman of Committee on Banking
and Finance.
"The country and the banks of the
country were never in better condi
tion than today. There is $1,500,
000,000 in gold and silver in the treas
ury and in trust funds, $130,000,000
free gold and $150,000,000 in gold re
serve. America can become the
banker nation of the world,''
FRANK A. VANDERLIP,
President of the National City Bank,
New York, Largest in the Country.
"A general war would cause a gen
eral depression of all business. We
lack ships to send our industrial and
agricultural products abroad. That
means a slowing down of manufac
turing and low prices for farm products."
GEORGE A. POST,
President of the Railway Business
Association.
"On the whole, only barm can
come from a general war. The Amer
ican railroads might gain some reve
nues but whatever is destroyed in
waste and destruction of war reduces
the ultimate power of investment in
new enterprises here. And the rail
way industry needs investment"
GEORGE M. REYNOLDS,
President of Continental and Com
mercial National Bank, Chicago,
Second Largest in U. S.
"Measured by other countries,
America is well off. We produce
or manufacture everything we need.
We do not depend upon other na
tions for our supply of anything; on
the contrary, other countries must
come to us. We will have the profit.
Our labor will be employed and our
mills running. In this way the war
ought to benefit us."
JOSEPH SCHAFFNER.
Large Manufacturer of Ready-made
Clothing.
"The price of clothing ought not
to be affected.
"I do not subscribe to the opinion
that America has everything to gain
in this war. There is nothing to gain
in any war. Foodstuffs are bound to
increase in price."
JOHN G. SHEDD,
President of Marshall Field Co., Larg
est Department Store in World.
"A general war, if declared, will
have no appreciable effect on this
season's business. A large propor
tion of the total bulk of imported
merchandise is already in storage.
Later purchases, however, may meet
with more difficulty on account of
the very high rate of exchange and
ocean insurance."
FRANCE
.STRIPE'S BLUE
WHITE AMD T5rD.
Washington. Regulation against
sale of large international money or
ders suspended.

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