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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, August 04, 1914, LAST EDITION, Image 20

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1914-08-04/ed-1/seq-20/

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"Mr. Ellison!" he stammered; and
suddenly a light of understanding
came upon his face. "You you
you suspected something and took it
home with you !'
"I took it home with me," answer
ed Ellison mechanically.
"That sandy rat that was in here
last week!" exclaimed Kahn with an
oath. "Wasn't it he, now? We
know who he was. Mr. Ellison
come here!"
He pulled his pocketbook from his
pocket, but Ellison was not hardened
enough for that.
"Well, then, it will be twelve hun
dred a year from today," said Kahn.
"You've saved me from bankruptcy.
You ." He stammered out his
thanks.
And Ellison was suddenly glad, be
cause of Dolly.
(Copyright by W. G. Chapman.)
Balloons to sound the sky, as it
"were, have been sent up 18 miles.
-o
WHY IS IT?
When you drink lemonade through
a straw do you pull the fluid to your
mouth or is it pushed up?
It surely seems that you are pulling
the lemonade, fairly dragging it up
with your breath, but what you are
really doing' is clearing a place in the
straw for the lemonade to fill as the
air pushes it up from the bottom.
When we suck lemonade or any
other liquid through a tube or straw
we lessen the pressure of air inside
the tube, and the pressure of air on
the surface of the liquid pushes it at
once up through the tube to the top,
where we have made room for it. By
our sucking we make room at the
top of the straw and the air pushes
the lemonade up to the space we 'have
made.
Every kind of sucking or suction,
to use the right word, is of the same'
kind. What seems like pulling is
really clearing the way so that what
ever is behind can be pushed upward.
o-
DISHES AMERICAN GOVERNORS LIKE BEST
Mrs. Byrne, wife of Governor Byrne
of South Dakota, writes a most inter
esting letter about her nusband's fa
vorite dishes.
BY MRS. F. M. BYRNE,
Executive Mansion, Pierre, S. D.
In these days of extravagant living
and feverish search for new dishes
with which to entertain our guests I
am especially glad to
tell you what my hus
band likes in "eats,"
although I fear they
wlil not add much to
your "roster."
If I have a special
favor to ask of my
husband I serve him
Gov. Byrne. baked potatoes; juicy,
broiled steak and delicious, amber
coffee, all piping hot.
Then, if I have something unpleas
ant which I must relate at luncheon
time, I serve with rich, creamy milk
cornmeal mush, which has cooked
slowly for two hours.
After dining and lunching on such
food as this my husbancl is ready to
solve any questions of state that may,
be brought before him.
My cornmeal mush is made by first
stirring the meal in cold water and
then turning the mixture into well
salted, boiling water, letting it cook
for two hours in double boiler, adding
hot water from time to time if necessary.
GRIDDLE CAKES
Beat 2 eggs in bowl until light,
add y2 teaspoon of. salt and 2 tea
spoons of sugar, add 1 cup of milk.
Sift 1 scant cup of flour with 1 heap-.
ing tablespoon of baking powder.
Have 1 pint of blueberries (they must
be perfectly dry) . Mix with flour and
stir lightly into liquid. Bake on hot
griddle, butter them while hot, sprin
kle with sugar and serve at once.

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