OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, August 14, 1914, LAST EDITION, Image 17

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1914-08-14/ed-1/seq-17/

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f 6oT MCE CfiRUHO AS GO&T
vAf,tow AS VEH mN BETVEeN .
JIMMIE'S THEORY
James started his third helping of
pudding with delight
"Once upon a time, James," ad
monished his mother, "there was a
little boy who ate too much pudding
and he burst!"
James considered.
"There ain't no such a thing as
too much pudding," he declared.
"There must be!" contended his
mother. "Else why did the little boy
burst?"
James passed the plate for the
fourth time, saying:
. "Not enough boy."
o o-
BRIGHT CHILD
One day Barrymore, the actor, was
walking in the street when Sidney
Rdsenfejd, the playwright, rushed up
to him all excitement.
"Oh, Maurice," he walled, "have
you heard of my misfortunes?"
"No; is there ilmess in your fam
ily?" "Not that," said Rosenfeld, "but
ahnost as bad. My little boy, 5 years
of age, got hold of my new play and
tore it to tatters."
"I didn't know that child, could
read," said Barrymore and contin
ued his walk. Argonaut Magazine.
o o
TOOK HIS ADVICE
"Take a tonic and dismiss from
your mind all that tends to worry
you," said the physician.
Several months afterwards the pa
tient received a bill from the physi
cian asking him to remit, and answer
ed it thus:
"Dear Doctor I have taken a tonic
and your advice. Your bin tends to
worry me) so I dismiss it from my
mind."
o o
A SUITABLE CALLING
"What business are you going to
put your son to, Brown?" '
"Well, haven't decided yet; but
judging from the hours ie keeps, I
should say he was naturally 'cut out
for a milkman."
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