OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, August 26, 1914, LAST EDITION, Image 11

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1914-08-26/ed-1/seq-11/

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WILL SHIPS THAT SAIL UNDER THE SEA' BLOW
DREADNAUGHT FLEETS OUT OF THE OCEAN?
Do you see the two sticks pointing out of the water with a-little trail
of "wash" and foam behind them? That's all that can be seen, from a sub
marine when it is below the surface. You can fancy how hard it must be
to locate them in a heaving ocean.
BY W. S. ZIMMERMAN.
Globe Trotter and Student of Inter
national Affairs. f
The greatest battle at sea in the
world's history can't be far off.
Germany cannot keep her fleet bot
tled up much longer.
And when the terrible sea battle
comes what will the submarines do?
Will the deadly little ships that sail
below the surface of the water decide
the combat?
The strain of watchful waiting
must be terrific to the- admiralty of
both England and Germany'. So naval
experts tell us to look for movements
by submarines either the English
below-sea boats sneaking into har
bors where the German, navy mon
sters are hiding, or the German sub
marines boldly going to sea to attack
Britain's' great warships.
There is little or no defense
against the submarine. Torpedo nets
and booms are useless; armor is im
potent; vigilance of no avail. Even
speed cannot save a ship marked for
destruction for there is no telling
when or in what direction to flee!
At 1,000 yards a torpedo seldom
misses its mark. The 200 pounds of
gun cotton it carries is sufficient to
send the biggest battleship to the.
bottom in a few seconds. And a sub-
marine, prepared to fire a dozen tor
pedos, can get within 300 yards of
its victim with little probability of
detection.
How do the little demons do it? Do j
they rise occasionally for light and air
like a seal or do they grope their way, t
blindly, deep below a protecting cur-,
tain of water? t
Periscopes, a clever adoption of an
old idea, make detection 'almost im-j
possible. There are L shaped tubes r
20 feet long and as many inches inx
diameter. The foot of the L projects
out of the water. In fact, that is all of j
the submarines vrhich does ahowj
above the surface.
In the periscope is. set a lense which,
casts a picture of the horizon above 0
water into a mirror set at an angle,
of 45 degrees. The mirror reflects j
the image catby the lense down the ,
Jongtube on to a widjte screen in the ."
captain's cabin. 'If you have ever seen; 4
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