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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, September 23, 1914, LAST EDITION, Image 20

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1914-09-23/ed-1/seq-20/

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point of tears, as they moved on, "let
me buy dolls for the whole crowd!"
But Lois smiled forbiddingly at his
reckless enthusiasm She was grave,
earnest, womanly the night he left
for the city. Her pulses fluttered as
he said in his awkward but manly
way:
"Miss Verner, I will come back 1
-o-
here for my vacation next year, if
you say so."
She looked up into his eyes earn
estly, as only a woman who is in love
can look. Then her head drooped
shyly as she whispered:
"Oh, please, Mr. Ware, please come
back sooner than that!"
(Copyright by W. G. Chapman.)
o-
CAROLINE COE'S AMAZING EXPERIMENT WITH
i A SACK OF FLOUR!
f BY CAROLINE COE
Do you know, Mrs. Housewife,
from actual experience, what you
can do with one sack of flour?
In any other line of business, ex
cept housekeeping, the proprietor will
tell you to a dot what he can do with
raw material, but can you as a house
keeper do as much?
A friend of mine, the other day,
said hereafter she was going to buy
her bread and cake and pastry at the
bakery, as flour, and not bakery
goods, had gone up. She added: "I
know it is much less trouble and I
expect to find it cheaper.
, This gave me a shock, for the ques
tion of proper nourishment did not
enter her mind.
Now, I have always baked all the
bread and pastries my family eats,
and I had an idea I was getting bet
ter bread, cakes and pies that I could
purchase at the bakery, and I also
thought that I was spending -les3
money than if I had bought bakery
goods.
However, I decided to make sure.
I bought an eighty-cent sack of flour
and started to do a little housekeep
ing' experiment. I would find out
what I could get out of that sack of
flour. I did.
ONE SACK OF FLOUR, 80 CENTS
' WHAT CAROLINE COE DID
WITH IT
I Made
16 loaves of bread.
102 rolls.
53 biscuits.
360 small cookies
2 double crest pies.
13 waffles.
9 tablespoonfuls flour for thicken
ing gravies.
The 16 loaves of bread at bakery
price equaled the amount spent for
the sack of flour, the other articles
were made with no flour expense, and
other necessary expenses for heat,
lard, etc., did not begin to bring up
the total cost to bakery figures. This
in itself must interest all housekeep
ers, but a greater argument than the
good value secured must be the fact
that all home-made food is much
WHAT YOU GET AT THE BAKERY
FOR 80 CENTS
You Get
16 small loaves of bread.
more nourishing than the bakery pro
duct. ,
o o j
ATLANTA AXIOMS
Tears are often- more effective
than the most eloquent words.
Men laugh at feminine folly, but it
fools them just the same.
Hard facts in the shape of silver
dollars are always appreciated. At
lanta JournaL
,&&,.

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