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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, September 26, 1914, LAST EDITION, Image 18

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1914-09-26/ed-1/seq-18/

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e A TARDY REPARATION
By John Eccles.
At first John Charlton had eaten
out his heart in loneliness; then, as
the weeks slippecMato months, he
grew reconciled to his fate. He could
never hope to return to England. He
had heen accused of forging his fath
er's name to a check.
His elder brother, the keir to the
estate, was the culprit. His brother's
"And Now I've Said as Much as I
Dare, John!"
wife had come to John and pleaded,
with tears in her eyes, that he assume
the guilt Everybody would suspect
him, she said frankly, because of his
recklessness and improvidence. There
was a girl Amy Nairn; she had look
ed favorably on the young man, and
he had been wildly in love with her.
But then John Charlton was never
able to resist a woman's pleading.
And his sister-in-law had taken him
at a weak moment
The upshot was that John went in
to exile. He had pleaded with Amy to
share his lot, and she had laughed
first; then, when he told her that he
was accused of forgery, her pretty
brows contracted and she had indig
nantly dismissed him.
So John had settled down to farm
ing in Jamaica, with the small sum
his father gave him. John often fan
cied the old baronet understood, but,
if he did, he gave no sign. He shook
hands with John; and so they parted
in silence.
v That was four years ago, and at
first John's heart had overflowed with
anguish. Time and again he had been
tempted to write to Amy, explaining
matters to her. But he refrained. And
at last he ceased to think of the past,
except in the desolate hours of mid
night. Then Haidee came into his life
Haidee, the only child of the rich Gre
ole plantation owner, with her soft
ways and winning innocence. The old
man would have been well content to
have John for a son-in-law without
asking any questions. He knew that
John was cold-shouldered by the
Kingston aristocracy, that he was
omitted from invitations to the gov
ernor's balls and dinners. But he did
not care. John was a good manager
and Haidee loved him.
So, four years after John's arrival,
they became engaged. The marriage
was to take place in a month's time.
Then it was that something hap
pened. John Crarlton received an invita
tion to the ball at the government
house.
He stared incredulously at the en
graved invitation note, for it was the
same governor who had always cold
shouldered him. However, he went.
Perhaps it was because he wanted
Haidee to take her rightful place In
Jamaica society; perhaps it was
merely his longing to look upon the
faces of his own kind again. John
went, and when he entered the ball
room and saw the men of his rank,

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