OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, October 10, 1914, LAST EDITION, Image 8

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1914-10-10/ed-1/seq-8/

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POLICE SHAKE-UP EXPECTED AS
RESULT OF REPORTER'S STORY
The discharge of several detective
sergeants may result from the story
told by Ben Kendall, a newspaper re
porter who was loaned to the crime
commission to try and determine the
relations between the police force
and criminals.
Kendall posed as a "dip" and in
this guise he says he paid $40 to two
detectives for protection. Kendall
claims ne met Harry is. rower, a
first-class detective sergeant, in the
Hotel Sherman bar and there framed
a working agreement.
"Now, you know you it's 50
50," Power said at that time, accord
ing to Kendall's testimony.
The next day Kendall met Power
in Foley's saloon at 3036 S. State st.,
and he claims paid him $25 for "pro
tection." He told the "dick" that he
had worked the crowd at the Pain
fire. The reporter says he gave De
tective Mulvey, a friend of Power,
$9.50, the change after buying a
drink.
According to Kendall's story, the
detectives recommended 63d and
Halsted sts. as a good ground to
"work," especially in the street cars,
which he said were well crowded.
The reporter says that the detec
tive advised him to "get in right" with
George Graham, a saloonkeeper at
6514 S. State St., who the "dick" said,
"was a power in this town."
"A lot of the brothers hang around
Graham's place and he stands by
them all. You go down there and get
in right with Graham. I will intro
duce you if you will be dowr. there
at 4 o'clock this afternoon find put
you in right with him," was the al
leged offer of the detective.
Later when he met Graham and
was put "in right" with him, the
saloonkeeper gave Kendall some ad
vice, Kendall says, telling him how to
use his protection.
According to Kendall, Graham
said, "When you get into trouble tell
the detectives I am your friend, and ,
they will see that you get what i3
coming to you and you will get out
as soon as I can get there.
"These detectives might pick you
up on a vag if you ge a wrong guy,
so I will give you the name of a man
whom you are suposed to work for.
"When a detective catches you,
you say you work for so and so, and
they will call him up, and he will say
you have been working for him for
the last six months."
o o
PROBE WHITE SLAVE CASE
Dis't Att'y Clyne is investigating
charge of another "frame up" white
slave case that of Dr. Louis P.
Weinberg of Ligonier, Ind., who was
indicted several months ago by the
federal grand jury under the Mann
act
That the girl, Miss Gracebelle
Locher of Ligonier is under the in
fluence of the town's rival doctor,
who is seeking to put the indicted
man out of business, is the accused
man's plea.
Dr. Weinberg was arrested after
an alleged trip to Chicago with the
country girl on May 6, 1913, when it
is said he registered at the Great
Northern Hotel with Miss Locher as
"A. K. Johnson and wife, Madison,
Wis."
- o o
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