OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, November 02, 1914, LAST EDITION, Image 20

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1914-11-02/ed-1/seq-20/

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tap Blandon. an,d not Riverton.1" My
father and a neighbor have,given the
company a two-mile right-of-way. It
shortens the route and I have the as
surance that the line will be put right
through."
"You're a wizard!" pronounced
Farson enthusiastically as Gib recited
the details of his visit Ito-tlje city.
"I don't know what I can do for
you after this vast benefit you have
wrought," said the manufacturer.
"I would like to be the first to com
municate the joyful news to Miss
Ina," said Gib modestly and flushing
pp. "In fact, she has discussed this
.
plan of mine and "
"Oho! fellow conspirators, eh?"
observed Mr. Ross, but he said it tol
erantly, with an admiring glance at
the young fellow who had shown
nerve, pluck and business capacity.
"All right, Gib"
" 'Jib,' sir, if you please," corrected
his loyal employe. "I was named
'Gibraltar by an old soldier uncle."
"And you have been a veritable ..
Gibraltar to the friends you stick x9
to!" declared Parson with effusion.
And, happily hopeful, Gib Ridgely
went to disclose the joyful news to
Ina.
WHAT THE SCHOOL CHILD SHOULD EAT
The child that sleeps on an over
loaded stomach brings a dull brain
to school next day. Here's what the
government dietician has to say to
the mothers of school children on
this important subject:
BY UNCLE SAM.
(Prepared as follows by food expert
of U. S. Dep't of Agriculture.)
As a rule the child should be given
fonly the simplest food at night.
Bread, milk, and simple sweets like
stewed fruits or plain cake, make a
good supper for litle children. The
most important parts of the break
fast are milk, cereal or toast, and
fruit. The question arises with school
children whether the heavy meal
ought to be at noon or night. At
noon the meal may interfere with the
afternoon work, at night with sleep.
It should be remembered that the
heavy meal usually means the one
which includes meat.
The nourishment obtained by the
grown person from meat is secured
by the child from milk. This may be
so distributed through the different
meals that there need be no espe
cially large meal. The lunch taken
by older people with the addition of
milk can be considered the dinner
of the child. His supper can then
precede the regular dinner of the
family and be very simple though
nutritious.
For school children a warm liquid
is desirable at noon. This may be
soup or cocoa. Chocolate is too rich.
The fact that fats remain longer in
the stomach than other substances
make it particularly undesirable to
serve fatty foods at noon if the child
is to return soon to work.
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