OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, November 17, 1914, LAST EDITION, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1914-11-17/ed-1/seq-4/

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STOCK YARqS OPEN AND THE
PRICE OF MEAT JUMPS
The stockyard's have opened and
the price of meat is going up.
Statements were plentiful on Sat
urday and Sunday-that the price of
meat would not goup. As usual,
these prophecies were contradicted.
In the brisk trade, which lasted all
yesterday among the cattle traders,
hogs went up from 40 to 50 cents, re
tail pork went up 1 cent a pound and
lamb jumped from 14 to 17 cents a
pound.
All stock arrived in sealed cars.
Seals were broken by government
inspectors, who looked at all animals
before their removal to the pens.
7,000 cattle, 17,000 hogs and 18,000
sheep were received yesterday.
Montana and Connecticut are the
latest states to be put under quaran
tine. o o
AD CAUSED WILD GOOSE CHASE
Last Friday an ad appeared in the
Chicago Daily News to the effect that
solderers were wanted by the Wm.
Green Mfg. Co., Harney, HI. A Chi
cago man out of employment bor
rowed 30 cents to go to Harvey, the
fare being 15 cent3 each way on the
electric.
When he got there he found that
there had been many applicants, and
that about two dozen came by mail,
but that the company had all the
solderers it wanted. In spite of that
fact the same ad appeared in. Mon
day's News. It may have sent other
unemployed men on a wild goose
chase, as it sent the one who went
to Harvey last Saturday.
o o
FIRE ROUTS SLEEPERS
Fire starting from unknown caus
es in the basement of Weinstein's
jewelry store, 17 W. Van Buren St.,
early this morning caused more than
50 Bhivering, pajama-clad or nature
dlad guests from the Men's Hotel,
21, and the Best Hotel, 23 W. Van
Buren
1AUTO HITS BOY PICKING UP
COAL IN STREET
Robert Parker, 7, 1947 Clybourn.
av., was struck and seriously injured
by an auto driven by James Probas
cc, 1954 Clybourn av., last night.
Robert's mother is poor and he
was dragging home his cart of food
from the county agent when he saw
a coal wagon overloaded. He fol
lowed it, picking up the pieces.
Probasco attempted to pass the
coal wagon. Robert's skull was frac
tured. His condition is serious.
Probasco was arrested and later
released on bonds.
Mrs. Parker, a widow with 3 chil
dren, became hysterical when she
heard of the accident.
ODD WAR BITS
Paris. Gen. Gallieni recently re
cently received letter from member
of parliament who is a private, sug
gesting certain changes in routine.
The parliament member got eight
davs' imDrisonment for not address
ing Gallieni though his own su
penor orticers.
London. Fatal street accidents
have increased in the capital 25 per
cent since the streets were ordered
darkened to prevent possible raiding
by Zeppelins.
Amsterdam. German mines dis
tributed in the north sea have an at
tachment resembling a submarine
periscope to lure allied ships in ram
ming them.
London. Fifty-five dollars a sec
ond is what the war is costing
Great Britain, according to Sidney
Webb, professor ot Public Adminis
tration at London University.
Petrograd Russian peasants
near Warsaw became suspicious of
a huge mound surrounded by wood
en crosses on which were hung Ger
rmn helmets. The peasants opened
the supposed grave and discovered
German quickfirers and a large quan
tise Oi. ammunition

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