OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, November 23, 1914, LAST EDITION, Image 18

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1914-11-23/ed-1/seq-18/

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AN ART DEVOTEE
By Myra Edith Collins
"Oh, Hiram,-..jny heart misgives
me!"
"It needn't, little bird. I have
thought everything over and I am
sure I am acting for the best You
will wait for me?"
"All the days of my life, if it has to
be!" cried Edna Brewer, between
smiles heroic and tears that wrenched
her loyal gentle heart.
"I shall miss life on the old range,
Edna," said Hiram Walters, earnestly,
"for I love the free hills, even the
very cattle, but I feel that I was made
for something beter. I have a one
thousand dollar capital to start in
with. Why can't make it the f ounda-
tion stdne of a great fortune in the
big city? Others have done it on
less. I, with the memory .of your
sweet love to encourage me, can do
wonders. Oh, sure I shall have
enough inside of a year to start us
out in life!"
"I shall hope for it, pray for it,
Hiram," said Edna sweetly, "but, oh!
it will seem very lonely with you gone
away."
So in the gray, cool dusk of the
prairie eventide they parted, both
filled with hope, love and, greatest of
all, faith each in the other and both
in the fair promises of the future.
There had ever been a lurking de
votion to art in the rude but healthy
nature of the young rancher. He
could not draw, but he had a won
derful sense of color values and color
beauty. A strolling artist had lighted
the flame of genius in his ardent soul
and while Hiram could not create a
picture he could take an outline print
or old Aztec pottery and bring forth
results as radiant as a rare peach
blown vase. It was a strange incon
gruous accomplishment and difficult
of analysis on the part of those who
recognized his latent ability. They
could not classify the gift nor direct
its uiility,..yet they traced a discrim
inating talent that should be of some
use in the world.
Hiram reached the city. He set his
pace firmly and kept away from art,
its galleries and its devotees. There
only was a lure. He had to turn his
face away from pictures he saw dis
played in shop windows for fear they
would lead him from his set practical
purposes.
Hiram was induced by a sleek
trickster to invest three hundred dol-
"How Is the Connoisseur Business
Getting Along?"
lars of his little store in speculation
and saw it melt away like snow. He
secured work as a clerk, but was not
up to city ways' and needed' a long ap
prenticeship. "I'm going to Ned Dunbar," he de
cided. Ned Dunbar was the name of the
artist Hiram had met out' on thq
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