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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, December 11, 1914, LAST EDITION, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1914-12-11/ed-1/seq-2/

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Mrs. Coley understoqd what it
meant to be jobless at this time of
the year. Every morning the papers
are filled with the stories of shortage
of work for women?- .
And she knew what itmeant to her
boy. His month's tuition was yet to
be paid. And there was no money
with which to give him a happy
Christmas.
So this morning in her little fur
nished room she surrendered and
turned on the gas.
The timely arrival of her landlady
save.d her. v Mrs. Coley may not die.
And possibly, an optimistic friend told
her at the hospital, her Christmas
may not be so dreary after all.
o o
SECY BRYAN ON SUFFRAGE AND
PROHIBITION HIS VIEWS
Lincoln, Neb., Dec. 11. Declaring
that, in his opinion, the time Is not
ripe for national action relative (to
woman suffrage and prohibition, but
that more can be done through the
agency of the various states, Secre
tary of State Bryan, in a signed edi
torial in the December issue of the
Commoner, says he is interested in
seeing the Democratic party take the
moral side of the questions.
If the Democratic party fails to
.heed this warning, declares Mr.
Bryan, it does so at its peril. He says
in part:
-"There is no reason to believe that
a prohibition amendment to the fed
eral constitution, or a suffrage
amendment, would at this time, be
ratified by three fourths of the states,
even if it secured a vote of two
thirds of the two houses.
"Believing in both women's suffrage
and the abolition of the liquor traffic,
I' would vote for either amendment if
Bubmitted, but the time does not seem
opportune for the submission of eith
er of these amendments. A national
contest for either amendment would
simply divert attention from other
issues upon which the people are
ELECTION FRAUDS JURY IS
THROUGH MAKES REPORT
The labors of the special grand
jury impaneled by Judge Cooper, in
June, 1913, to investigate election
frauds, is over. Yesterday it disband
ed after making a report.
Altogether the. jury heard 2.000
witnesses, returned 22 indictments
charging 71 men with "making false
election returns, altering ballots and
neglect of duty. Three indictments
charging perjury in the election fraud
cases were also returned. One was
against Paul Rothenberg, who was
star witness of Stafte's Attorney
Hoyne in the trial of Samuel Gold
man and Harry Minsky last August.
A recount of ballots by official staff
of election commissioner's office .to
prevent future frauds is recommend
ed by the jury.
BITS OF NEWS
Louis Karpie, 4951 S. Robey, car
repair for Penn. R. R., hit by train
at 48th. Left arm off; right leg
broken.
Over 30 destitute families being
cared for by the Woodlawn Business
Men's Ass'n
Ruth J. Collins, 17, daughter of
Michael Collins, new president school
board, recovering from operation for
appendicitis.
Prof. Berhhard Dernburg, former
colonial minister for Germany, says
that to have held Belgian neutrality
sacred would have been suicide -for
Germany.
Mrs. Margaret Colly, 35, 1038 N.
La Salle, cut wrists and turned on
gas in suicide attempt Out of job.
May live.
ODD WAR NEWS
London. "Don't forget those cig
arettes you promised me," wrote a
soldier to his wife. "By the way," he
added in a postscript, "the Germans
just started shelling us. You may
Jiot have to send the smokes."
Petrograd. All naturalized Ger-.
mans and Austrian extraction be
tween the ages of 20 and 30 have
been, summoned, for. miUtary.idu.tyj,
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