OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, December 14, 1914, LAST EDITION, Image 10

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1914-12-14/ed-1/seq-10/

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BRING ABOUT THAT FORFEITURE, AND GET FOR THE PEOPLE
THAT AUTOMATIC SYSTEM.
By so doing they can convince everybody that the wisest thing the
people ever did was to give the women the right to vote and a voice in city
government.
They have a golden-opportunity to show that the women can do for
the people what the men have failed to do.
They can show that to the women politics means more than, mere job
getting and job-holding; that it means PUBLIC SERVICE; that it means
a practical use of the machinery of government for the benefit of the peo
ple of Chicago, rather than for the exploitation of the people, by Big Busi
ness and Special Privilege.
I have favored equal rights of citizenship of women with men for years
because I believed that WOMEN WOULD BRING GOVERNMENT
CLOSER TO THE PEOPLE than men have brought it; and because I be
lieved that the daily life, THE HEALTH, HAPPINESS AND PROGRESS
OP MEN, WOMEN AND CHILDREN WOULD BE CONSIDERED BY
THEM AS VASTLY MORE IMPORTANT THAN MERE JOB-GETTING
FOR POLITICAL WORKERS.
The very first public"problem they are unitedly attempting to solve la
one that means much for every family in Chicago; and I believe the women
of Chicago are capable of solving that problem.
The people understand the difference to them of telephone service at a
PENNY A CALL under PUBLIC OWNERSHIP as compared with FIVE
CENTS a call for PRIVATE PROFIT.
o o
LETTERS TO EDITOR
VISITING NURSES
Editor Day Book In the Chicago
Herald of Dec. 9 there is a very ur
gent appeal to the pocketbooks of the
Chicago public in behalf of the Visit
ing Nurses Ass'n.
In the November number of the
American Journal of Nursing there
is an article which begins as follows:
"When a splendid gift is generously
presented it would be churlish indeed
of the recipient to accept it thank
lessly; consequently, when a certain
weary, public health nurse found her
self, on a Montreal through train, with
a trip to Europe and a two months'
leave of absence on salary in her
pocket, she pinched herself vigor
ously to make sure she. was awake
and thanked her guiding star for her
opportunity."
The bearing which this has upon
the appeal from the society for aid is
easily seen when I tell you that it was
written by Edna L. Foley, superin
tendent of the Visiting -Nurses' Ass'n
Edna Foley receives a salary of $250
per month (by now it may be $300 as
there was some talk of raising it)
and. the society which can afford and
does pay such a salary has no right
to appeal to the public for help.
Hiss Foley's much more capable
predecessor worked for years for a
a salary of $100; She built up the
visiting nurse work, started all of the
tubercular nursing and school nurs
ing work in Chicago, and for a time
carried 'on all three' under her man
agement This very spjendld woman
was only receiving a salary of $150
per month when the- Visiting Nurses'
Ass'n- dismissed her to make way for
her present successor at almost twice
her salary and none of her experi
ence. .
JThe Visiting Nurses' Ass'n is calling
upon the public for "funds to help
carry on their work and the public
should call, upon the Visiting Nurses'
Ass'n to explain why its money is
spent in exorbitant salaries to a few.
It should also be asked why it dirt
not. keep -the funds necessary fora..
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