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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, December 23, 1914, LAST EDITION, Image 10

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1914-12-23/ed-1/seq-10/

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g. mmij mil, vtmmymmnsju u iy wjgsyjwpwi
else to bearierry' for, then be merry
because you have Hope.
A pupil of the same school. Mrs.
0. U.
THE SIGNAL OF CHARITY
Editor Day Book The "satelyte"
of "the World's Greatest Daily"
comes out with the old-time custom
"put a taper in the window to light
the Christ Child on His way."
This is beautiful
This is practical Christianity. Pro
vided they follow the simple lessons
of the lowly Nazarene.
"If thou hast two coats give one
to they brother."
The light in the window can be
the signal of "welcome" for the one
who "has not where to lay his head."
The Christ Child is still in His in
fancy, in spirit, considering the two
thousand years of His teachings and
the merciless slaughter of His pro
fessing "followers."
"The down-and-out" jobless work
er, unable to sustain the spark of life
in his tired frame through lack of em
ployment could read volumes in the
simple sign of'the light in the window
provided it meant "for all you who
thirst and hunger" I have a cup of
hot coffee and a home-made dough
nut, enter aid be convinced.
Then I would be in favor of a can
dle in each window of Chfcago
homes.
The Herald can make a real bene
fit from a sime idei it is considers
the empty stomachs of those who
look through its "help wanted" col
umns in vain, by suggesting a rap
ing hand as well as a light on the
way for the "son of man." A. G. B.
o o
Experiments with the dynamomet
er show that a man is his weakest
when he turns out of bed. Our mus
cular force is greatly increased by
breakfast, but it attains to its high
est point after the mid-day meal. It
then sinks for a few hours, rises to
ward evening, but steadily declines
from night to morning.
CITY AND TRACTION CO.'S FIGHT
IS ON TODAY
Today the court fight of the city
against the traction companies for
better service will be continued be
fore Judge Newcomer.
The suit charges the company with
failing to place destination signs on
the 39th street cars.
"The signs fail to show the pas
senger where he may expect the car
to take him," said Ass't Corporation
Counsel George L. Reker, in charge
of the campaign. "This does not pre
vent the conductor from forcing the
passengers to alight at any point he
wishes to reverse the car."
The alleged violation of other or
dinances by the companies will be
taken up in turn.
Just how much the street railways
companies care about city ordinances
is shown by the fact that they will
soon have 1,650 suits filed against
them by the department of public
service.
Cases in which, if the maximum
penalty were collected, the city would
get $197,500 in fines have been pre
pared by Commissioner Perry and R.
F. Kelker, an assistant.
The suits are for failure to post
signs giving the destination of cars
and rules affecting the use of trans
fers, failure to stop in the middle of
certain blocks designated by the
council and refusal to take transfers
at regular transfer points.
o o
ELKS GIVE OUT BASKETS
Fifteen hundred baskets, loaded
down with the makings of Christmas
dinners, were distributed among poor
families yesterday by Chicago Elks..
Nearly 1,000 more baskets will be
distributed today. .
Miss Olivia P. Tescott of Espy, Pa.,
is believed to be the only bride In
America who had her wedding cake
made entirely of ostrich eggs. It was
given to her by the employes of an .
ostrich farm in Bloomsburg. -,.
In ii mil fir riVtJnriiAlt-"-'t-iJr 1r.ii ntrtl?Mii2rifc-rrfi1liaittl 1
MiHHHMBHMM

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