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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, December 26, 1914, LAST EDITION, Image 20

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1914-12-26/ed-1/seq-20/

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ear, and we will start" our new life in
a new world."
"Yes, I will come with you," she an
swered mechanically. Her face was
very pale. Gardiner looked at her; he
was surprised at- her ready acquies
cence; he had expected that the pas
sion which swept him off his feet
would at least be met by the plea of
duty. There was no shrinking in
Margery's mind.
"I will come with you, to the worlcfSH
end, she answered, supping her hand
in his. ,
He strode out on the tilted deck,
and, clinging to the rail, peered sea
ward, where the ball of the sun was
springing into the sky. Black against
it rode a tiny craft. ,
"Margery!" she shouted, drawing
her to the rail. k
It carries the hope of life. And the
minutes passed and they stayed there,
watching the ship grow larger. The
vessel had been sighted, and, though
the stranger could not know that
there were living beings aboard this
derelict, she was pushing hard toward
them for investigation.
Half an hour had passed. 'The ves-
sel was not plainly to be seen. She
was a British cruiser. It was a furi
ous race between her and the sea.
Clinging to the rail, Gardiner felt the
deck at an angle of 60 degrees be
neath him. The ship was trembling,
precursor of the final plunge under
the waves. But life was looking at
them again, and the war vessel was
very near.
He tore his coat from his back and
waved it frantically. The cruiser was
now less than a mile away. Sudden
ly a boat shot forth from her side.
And the last minutes of the. fight
were never clear in the man's mind,
so close was the finish. But he seem
ed to Temember that, as the ship
strained and heaved, and gathered
herself for destruction, they slid down
the upraised side into the boat that
lav beneath, manned bv a dozen
sturdy "bluejackets. There came the'
hard ply of oars to escape the dread
ful vortex and suddenly 'where the
liner had been was only a great swirl
of bubbling water.
Half an hour later the two sat side
by side upon the warship's decks.
Gardiner was studying his compan
ion's face. Would she regret? Would
she change? Would life alter her will
ingness to go with him, while her
husband lived.
He knew -that, as she had drawn
him, so she had the power to send
him out into life, hopeless.
Margery turned toward him and
slipped a paper into his hand.
"Read that," she said. "I fqund it
in the wireless room."
Gardiner read: "Your husband
died last night."
o o
THE AFTERMATH
'Twas the night after Christmas, and
all through the flat
Not a creature was stirring, not even
the cat
From father and mother and me and
the kid,
Every one was knocked out with a
pain in his mid
Because of the canaies we ate for a
lark,
And kid from the paint that he
chewed from his ark. '
q o
SOME IMAGINATION
Wuzzybug I hear you were on a
toot last night?
Puzzybug Pact! I slept in an,
automobile torn,
riiiaaiflifiiS

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