OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, January 02, 1915, LAST EDITION, Image 19

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1915-01-02/ed-1/seq-19/

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success beyond all doubt Every one
bought it, from Boss Gregory to the
high school boys.
At the end of three months Allan
was writing nearly all the editorials,
under Smith's guidance. The older
man confessed that the youngster
could beat him at his own game.
Then Allan wrote gleefully to Mil
dred: "The time is coming, dear. After
the approaching elections we shall
have a new government. Then busi
ness will flow our way. Gregory and
his satellites will be consigned to the
outer darkness. I shall be raised
again, and we will be married!
Think of that! Married!"
Four weeks before the elections, to
his amazement, the young fellow was
waited on by a deputation of citizens
at his boarding house. They wanted
him to run for the office of sheriff,
paying $2,500 yearly.
"But I don't know anything about
the work!" exclaimed the boy, de
lighted. "i am afraid, Mr. Gray, there is
very little chance of your election,"
said the chief of the deputation can
didly. "The sheriff's post has always
gone to a Gregory man. You know
Tom Vincent has an enormous -following
of heelers. He has had the
position ten years now. Still, there
must be a turn-over there must,
you may get in. Let us put you on
Gray accepted and told Mr. Smith
enthusiastically next morning. To
his surprise his employer was not
overenthusiastic. To his greater sur
prise, that day Smith told him to "go
slow" instead of to "ginger up."
"We mustn't overdo it," he ex
plained lamely. "We don't want to
create a reaction."
While Allan stared at him, speech
less in surprise, Smith put on his coat
and hat.
"I've got a luncheon appointment,"
he said. "See here, young man, are
you as stupid as you appear to be
or ?"
He got no further, for at that mo
ment he was struck down with apo
plexy.. An ambulance was called and
the doctor took the man away to the
hospital.
"He'll probably get well," he said.
"But it will be some time before he i
can use his pen or do any work
again."
Allan, left alone in the office, did"
not know what to do. Therefore, he
started to do his work exactly as
though the unexpected had not hap
pened. He was hard on a biting edi
torial when the shadow of a man in
a silk hat fell across his desk and
caused him to start round.
Behind him, immaculately dressed,
his "heavy jowl set in a sneering
smile, stood Gregory himself.
"Well, sir!" said Allan, rising.
"This is bad news about Mr.
Smith," said the boss.
"I should hardly expect you to take
it that way, sir," suggested Allan.
The ola boss took a chair at his
side. "So you are the young man
that has been holding me up before
the public gaze as a scoundrel!" he
said.
"Now, if I had a young man like
you with me," he said, "what would
I not be able to do?"
"I can't be bought, Mr. Gregory,"
said Allan.
"I don't need to buy you, my boy,"
answered the other. "At least, I don't
think I do. But Smith can't talk and
what's the good of owning him?"
"I don't understand " Allan be
gan. "I know you don't," answered the
other. "I never thought you did from
the beginning. Your editorials had
the ring of truth; his didn't. Well,
then, my friend Jim Smith started
this paper to get bought out. Un
derstand that? I wouldn't buy at his
price. I didn't believe he could hurt
me. He could. I was wrong for once
in my life. When I came up to his
terms he went higher. So we played
teeter till four weeks before election.
-"o-z---r - afc.

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