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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, January 15, 1915, LAST EDITION, Image 9

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1915-01-15/ed-1/seq-9/

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ONE MAN'S OPINIONS
BY N. D. COCHRAN
A Patient People. The people of
Chicago are the most patient people
I ever knew anything about. The
street railway barons and the poli
ticians have 'em so well trained that
the folks will eat out of their hands.
Not only that, but the poor, patient
suffererswill stand for the rottenest
street railway service in the U. S.
The Humane society wouldn't per
mit human beings to treat dumb
beasts like the handful of men who
own the street railway treat the
men, women and children of this big
town.
The people listen day after day to
talk of subways that can't be built for
years to come, when it is easily pos
sible to improve the service with what
system we have now 100 per cent.
Isn't it strange, when you think it
over, that a mere handful of men in
charge of the street railwavs nan ait
back in their limousines and laugh at
over two million people, and make
them stand for whatever service the
magnates see fit to give them?
How does it happen that fewer men
than would fill a street car can have
THEIR way about street railway
service and make two millions pack
themselves into the cars like so many
sardines?
Og Armour can't pack cattle, sheep
and hogs into a stock car like the peo
ple are packed in a street .car and get
away with it
The streets belong to the people.
The street railways are operated only
by consent of the people. One of the
considerations for use of the public
streets is good service. It was prom
ised, but never given. Good service
by a privately-owned street railway
isn't good business.
Good business demands that cars
be packed to. full capacity and as few
cars as possible kept running.
Yet the patient boobs of Chicago
stand on the corners, in all kinds of
weather, and wait, wait, wait for a
chance to get a toe-hold on the step
of a crowded car.
"WHY do the people stand for it?
LETTRSTO-EDITOR
A PERTINENT QUESTION
Editor Day Book I have read "An
Interested Reader's" views on prosti
tution, and wish to ask him some per
tinent questions.
I wonder if this gentleman who
considers prostitution so necessary
would be willing to offer his daugh
ters to save some upright, Chris
tian (?) young gentlemen from be
coming imbeciles. Surely such a
noble cause deserves our greatest
support! By the way have you no
ticed that our institutions are filled
with the frequenters of the segregat
ed district?
Can this Christian gentleman ex
plain the standing of prostitution in.
the light of Christ's words to the re
pentant prostitute: "Go and 'sin' no
more"?
'A solution to this problem by a
prostitute is as far distant as the so
lution of the problem of theft by a
thief. Interested Inquirer.
SHELTER HOME FOR WOMEN
Editor Day Book Reading article
in the Tribune of Dec 30, I make
personal appear to the president of
the World's Fair board and stockhold
ers, as one of the small stockholders
of the World's Columbian exposition,
that the full amount of the $45,000
noV held in that fund be used for a
home for temporary relief for self
respecting and self-supporting wom
en of our city, where the shelter and
protection of our women may be re
ceived at that critical time, when out
of money, shelter and the protection
necessary from the dangers of the
streets of Chicago, when money and
hope are all gone, and the parting of
the ways is apparent where the path
of fallen souls or death by suicide
are but a choice. Then and at that
moment the departed" souls fr
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