OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, January 21, 1915, LAST EDITION, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1915-01-21/ed-1/seq-1/

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LAST EDITION ONE CENT
LONDON PROVES U. S. COULD BEAT CAR TRUST
CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATION ATTACKED
GIRL DIES; MEN HELD DARNELL TO MARRY.
THE DAY BOOK
An Adless Newspaper, Daily Except Sunday
N. D. Cochran, gggggSft Telephones:
Editor and PufeKsher. liP Editorial Monroe 353.
500 South Peoria St. 398 Circulation Monroe 3826.
VOL. 4, NO. 97
Chicago, Thursday. Jan. 21, 1915
ONE CENTj
ARMOUR, SWIFT AND OTHERS CALLED
TO EXPLAIN "DUMMY" MILLIONAIRE
'Judge Windes Orders Beef Bosses' Appearance to Tell
of Louis C. Ehle's Dealings With Their Cotton.
Mills Was Rated by Dun's as Millionaire
Owes $42,000, According to Suit
J. Ogden Armour, Louis F. Swift
and other stockyards men are order
ed by Judge Windes to answer cer
tain questions inside of thirty days.
These questions any time they are
answered will tell the whole story of
how the beef trust set up Louis C.
Ehle as owner and operator of a $3,
000,000 string of oil mills in Texas,
Arkansas and Tennessee, and how
Ehle, the dummy, was shoved to the
front to pose as "the heavy gun," the
biggest cotton oil magnate in the
country. . x
The suit was brought by Arba N.
Waterman, former circuit judge of
Cook county, office First National
Bank bldg. He claims he loaned
$42,000 to Ehle and he let Ehle have
the money because Ehle showed him
bank books and mercantile agency
reports indicating that Ehle was a
real millionaire instead of only a
dummy and was worth loaning
money to. Now Waterman wants this
money from the packers.
The machinery by which a big
corporation does business through
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