OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, January 29, 1915, LAST EDITION, Image 11

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1915-01-29/ed-1/seq-11/

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'All we ask the state to do is to ap
point a commission of honest men
with power to govern the conduct of
the sport.
We can't see why self-appointed
guardians of public morals should
have anything to say about it. Those
mollycoddles have no use for manly
sport, but waste their time on badly
written screeds which unfortunately
often are published by good-natured
editors.--John Gibson, 4762 Broadway.
A SUGGESTION. Five attempted
burglaries at my own home, out of
which two were successful; ten with
in 100 feet of my home, and twenty
within 100 yards of my home. All
this within the last six weeks. How's
that?
Don't you thing that the millions
Chicago spends for the maintenance
of her police force should be spent
usefully?
Dispense with the police depart
ment Furnish a good Winchester
rifle to each householder, who shall
divide the hours of the night irito
watches, and have each member of
his family take a turn on sentry duty.
The citizens, instead of paying for
police protection that they don't get,
would then at least be getting the
real protection had on the western
prairies several generations ago.
H. G. W.
WILSON'S DIPLOMACY. A sam
ple of President Wilson's diplomacy
may be seen in his apparent opposi
tion to the literacy test for immi
grants' while the warring nations are
furtively looking in our direction.
Japan's policy, like ours, is one of
"watchful waiting." Stfe is waiting
for the Teuton to be humbled beyond
a certain point before reverting to
the California incident
The literacy test is a polite re
minder to her, among others, that
hordes of unfortunates pouring in
upon us just now would only be
shifting a burden that will have In
volved us more hopelessly in &
senseless world war. This is no time
to offer asylum to dreamers from
other lands.
Unrestricted immigration may be
right from many points of view in.
times of peace, but just now the law
of self-preservation as applied to our
selves would mean a recognition of
our power to help those whose mo
tives have long interpreted as -being
at least not unfriendly. J. Jacobson,
Niles Center.
SEGREGATION AND REGULATION.
If we are to have a segregated dis
trict in Chicago by all means let us
have one that fills its mission, which
is, the protection of the public health
and welfare.
If sex desire masters and cannot
be mastered, if the demanl of nature
is as tyrannously insistent as some
men claim, then let us frankly face
this situation.
Let us establish a segregated dis
trict out in the light and sunshine,
palong some boulevard perhaps, not in
a filthy, hileous, squalid, dark corner
of the city, as has always been done.
If it is a necessity, as its patrons
claim, why this secrecy and shame?
But let us insist that all prostitu
tion be confined to this district It
must in fact as well as in theory pro
tect the public Let us make it a
criminal offense to solicit outside of
this district Let us, with righteous
indignation, speedily punish all of
fenders, especially men offenders,
who formerly have been so leniently
dealt with by their sympathetic
brother administrators of the law.
We know from experience the dis
eases and evils that follow in the
wake of such a district, even unto
the third and fourth generations.
Against these we must be heroically
on our guard, putting aside all inher
ited prejudices and conventionalities.
This district must be managed
scientifically.
All inmates must be registered
I names, ages, nationality, whether
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