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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, February 23, 1915, LAST EDITION, Image 10

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1915-02-23/ed-1/seq-10/

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devil some more.
Frank Smith.
That's all.
A CAPITALIST'S ADVICE I read
some pretty strong criticisms in the
colums of your Open Forum against
the'capitalist systenflsrevailing in this
country in general and the capitalists
themselves in particular. Now I, as
a capitalist, want to speak directly
to those most strongly opposed and
ask this question: What do you want
us tb do? Do you not realize that
you are much more to blame for the
present conditions than we are? Can
we control our being born to wealthy
parents any more than you could con
trol your being born to poor ones?
Is the simple fact that you have no
money and I have, sufficient reason
for me to share mine with you and
the millions with you? Would you
do that were you in my position?
Candidly, I am very much afraid you
would not However, this does not
prove anything one way or the other
and the simple facts of the matter
are these: You, the working people
will never get that which you are
striving for by simply sitting back
and pointing your fingers derisively at
us and crying shame, because that
wflVget you nothing, as we do not
even see or hear you. When you
want something, do not expect the
party who has it to give it to you
simply because he knows that you
crav6 it Because, unless It be very
much.to his interests to do so, he will
most assuredly not be so accommo
dating. Anything that is worth hav
ing' is worth fighting for. You will
have: to fight hard and long for your
wants, and fight not only the capital
ists themselves, but also their agents,
your own dear, elected officials, judg
es arid policefilcere, who so dili
gently ply thw clubs in time of
strikes, without using enough horse
sense to realize that they are them
selves workers in the same position
as you and should be protecting you,
thereby protecting their own inter
ests. Instead of which they club you
' in the intetests of property; and you,
at the next election, which is the only
opportunity- you have of voicing a
protest, say as plainly as words can:
"We like that clubbing, give us more
of it," by voting for and electing the
same officials. Simply because your
neighbor who holds some city, coun
ty or state job through political ap
pointment comes to you and says,
"Vote for Mr. , he's a good fel
low, he gave me a job and handed out
several other jobs in this ward, and
we should see that he gets re-elected
by all means," and you, fool that you
are, forget all that he has done to
your detriment; forget the beautiful
clubbing that the police gave you at
his Instigation, forget your pitiful
struggle for existence under the pres
ent conditions; forget all your vows
of vengeance, made at the time when
your head still ached from the club
bing; forget that the election day bal
lot is your only means you have of
voicing your protest; forget the
thousand and one other reasons why
you should not vote for him, and cast
your ballot for the very man against
whom you are howling bitterly and
loudly every day In the year. This
neighbor of yours, who holds some
minor underpaid job perhaps, acts
with as little discretion in telling you
to vote lor that candidate, and ap
plies as little horse sense to his rea
soning as does the aforementioned
policeman.
If you, the workers of this coun
try, know what you want, you should
also know how to get it You will
never get it by roasting us, knocking
us or treating us with disdain or de
rision (that is, among yourselves,
because there are very few, if any,
workingmen today who have the
courage or spirit to fade a man whom
he knows to have money and tell him
to his face his exact sentiments re
garding him) . Nor wiH you ever gain
your end by an unorganized -attack.
The only solution to is problem
Is organization," complete and me
thodical. If the workers could but re-
t B
k y '

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