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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, February 23, 1915, LAST EDITION, Image 9

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1915-02-23/ed-1/seq-9/

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THE DAY BOOK
N. D. COCHRAN
EDITOR AND PUBLISHER.
500 SO. rEOIUA ST. CIIICAGO, ILL.
Editorial, Monroe 333
Jetepnones ctrcnlntlon. Monroe 383
SUBSCRIPTION By Carrier in Chicago.
30 cents a Month. Br Mall. United
States and Canada. J3.00 a Year.
Entered as second-class matter April
21, 1314. at the postolfice at Chicago.
Ill, under the. Act of March 3. 1879.
JAPS AT THE OPEN DOOR. If
Japan's demands on China are really
such as the cablegrams just pub
lished show, Japan is going to close
' that "open door" with a bang.
Why not? Japan anticipates the
inevitable conflict, commercial, if not
martial, between the yellows and the
whites. Nations that might interfere,
including her great and honorable
ally, Great Britain, are busy, and Un
cle Sam doesn't want to and isn't
prepared to fight. As the Manches
ter, Eng., Guardian well says, "Gloom,
in Europe is sunshine for Japan, so
' Japan is making hay."
China doesn't know what she
wants or has got, or will have, and
Japan will teach her, collecting a
large fee for the tuition. That Japan
did not show all its cards to the Brit
ish, French, U. S. and Russian rep
resentatives may be treacherous, but
it's Japanese.
MEN MADE THE POLITICS.
Nixola Greeley-Smith tells Puck:
"Some men say they have too much
respect for women to want to see
them in politics. Why not have more
respect for politics?"
Scratch through the hide of most
any one of those men, Nixola, and
you'll find a fellow who has made his
policies so dirty that he can't respect
anybody who enters it. You'll find
wife-beaters particularly opposed to
woman's contamination by politics.
THE PUBLIC FORUM
A STRAP HANGER, It Is bften
difficult to get the-wotormen tcrtstop
at Germania st. They do not tik&.to
be bothered. I called Germaniaist.
plainly when we passed Burtonlipl.
being standing in the compartment
with the motorman. When he did. not
stop I called it again. MotormaaiNo.
6003 remarked insolently: "Weawill
give you Germania st. when we CQme
back." E. E. Meredith. Mc
A PRESSMAN'S VIEW. As1 a
union man I object to the last three
paragraphs of the letter writte by
L. P. P. The writer is either ignorant
or a hypocrite. As a business agent
of a labor union he should knowthat
there is only one political partythat
is for the union man at all time's', be
fore and after election. For his spe
cial benefit I wish to state that the
Socialist party is the only true repre
sentative of the working masses. A
Common Lay Member of Fra'nklin
Union No. 4.
HE SAYS THEY AGREE. -My
views on Socialism and those 6f Mr.
Hahn's are precisely the same and
had he read my article with "more
care he would have come to theffeaihe
conclusion. 3rt '
It certainly would be foolish for
any worker to keep all he produced
for himself. When I said that zf 'doc
trine of a community of interefs is
the best form of society I only mi6fed
good authority and I consider' to
mean the same as the co-operative
commonwealth. "
I have heard speakers who1 call
themselves real Socialists state dis
tinctly that Socialism meant thSfcfthe
workers would receive all they pro
duced. They call it lromplete: revo
lution. Such a complete revolution
as that would be equally as. t?aif as
the complete capitalist system w'e-are
kicking about today. jv -
What seems silly to some js&gms
plausible to others. Give " xahL th?

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