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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, April 08, 1915, NOON EDITION, Image 6

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1915-04-08/ed-1/seq-6/

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BASEBALL SPORTS OF ALL SORTS BOXING
Jess Willard will show himself to
the people of Baltimore tomorrow
night and then hurry on to New York
for gala doings Saturday. The big
town is expected to give him a great
reception, paying Tom Jones, Jack
Curley and their associates large
wads of coin for the privilege.
Jim Coffey and Carl Morris, two
challengers for Willard's title, fought
ten tough rounds in New York, Cof
fey getting the verdict. Morris was
severely punished, but stuck gamely
to the finish and avoided a knockout
by ability to absorb punishment. He
was badly cut up at the finish.
Joe Chip bested Chicago Tommy
Murphy in fifteen rounds at Dayton,
O. Early in the fight Murphy's su
perior cleverness gave him a lead, but
Chip wiped this out in the tenth with
a volley of body blows.
Ad Wolgast has accepted terms to
battle Freddie Welsh ten rounds be
fore a Milwaukee club May 4. Wol
gast's right arm and hand have been
examined and it is believed the wing
will be strong enough to stand the
strain of a battle with the champion.
Wolgast has been compelled to can
cel his recent engagements because
of another injury to his oft-broken
arm.
Artie Hofman, in quitting the
Brooklyn Feds after an argument
with Manager Magee, says he will go
to his home in Akron, O., and remain
there until he hears from President
Ward of the Tip Tops. Magee coun
tered with the statement that any
move toward a reconciliation by
Ward would result in a search for a
new manager.
Exmoors of Wilson Av. Y. M. C. A.
won heavyweight basketball title of
Amateur Athletic Federation, defeat
ing Sherman Park, 28 to 21.
Baseball Scores
Illinois 6, Alabama 0.
Northwestern 11, Armour 5.
Oak Park 4, Lewis 0.
President Thomas of the Cubs is
suffering through the activities of
some of his fellow-magnates in or
ganized baseball. Through all this
wrangling with the Federals the ex
ecutive of the local National leaguers
has managed to keep his skirts clear,
and his relations with President
Weeghman of the Whales have been
amicable. Both -are good sportsmen.
Thomas, has written a letter to
Weeghman asking that the Feds re
imburse the Cubs for the services of
George McConnell, who leaped to the
Whales when he was released to
Louisville by Manager Bresnahan.
He points out that the action wasn't
fair, considering the fact that Judge
Landis has the 0. G.-Fed suit under
advisement.
Weeghman will pay no attention to
the matter. He can counter with the
argument that he is only following
the tactics employed by organized
magnates since the Fed suit was
started. He can cite the cases of Poll
Perritt, Ivy Wingo and a few more to
bear out his contention. He is fight
ing fire with fire, which is the only
course left open.
Unfortunately, this course hits the
Cubs, who are made to suffer for the
sins of others.
The significant point in the tangle
is that an organized baseball magnate
has virtually offered to sell a player
to the Feds. This is a radical depar
ture from past attitudes, and will
probably cause Ban Johnson and
some other anti-Fed people a few
moments' uneasiness. Ban is begin
ning to realize that club owners do
not relish the loss of coin in the pres
ent war, even though it. does give the
big boss opportunity to open his hop
per and tear off windy statements.
It has been a long, hard road, and
the Whales, the first of Chicago's
three big league teams to reach
home, will be glad to see the bright
lights and a real bed tonight. They
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