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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, May 04, 1915, NOON EDITION, Image 14

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1915-05-04/ed-1/seq-14/

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will appear in six chapters in The
Day Book. Editor.)
BY MARY FULLER
(Written specially for The Day Book)
.Copyright, 1915by the Newspaper
Enterprise Association)
CHAPTER I.
Going into the movies is becoming
a fad. Society folks have taken it up
for their own amusement, scientific
circles are using the movies, educa
tors employ the movie camera, war
correspondents are in their element
snapping battle scenes, and last, but
not least, people of the so-called "le
gitimate" stage are flocking to the
studios.
It is but natural that the thoughts
of many talented young girls should
turn to the movie studios. I receive
perhaps 50 letters every week from
these would-be photoplayers asking
my advice or help. And oh, I would
.so love to help them all because I
know how hard the road and how
many disappointments. I try to an
swer as many as possible of the let
ters that display more than ordinary
intelligence and my advice to deter
mined little sisters is:
"Visit the various studios and take
your chance. That is the best way to
see the managers. Writing letters or
sending photos is a mere waste of
time and stamps. There are too many
applicants on, the ground to give the
managers time to answer those ap-.
plying in letters.
Unless you have had some experi
ence, or possess exceptional talents,
or come with a reputation made in.
some other way, Little Sister, you
are usually putn the "crowds" at
first and afterward may be advanced
to a "bit," to see how you carry it and
how you photograph. People don't
realize that one may be handsome on
the street and photograph badlyj or
vice versa.
Coloring in the face does-not count
at all. What matters is the modeling
of the face, the. contour and the flex-
ihilitv of RYnression.
There is so much humdrum in the j
film world that the original girl, the
"live" one, stands out And when
you are marked, as original, as crea
tive, you have .your feet well planted
for a rise up the ladder.
It is what is meant when the stage
manager implores you to "be natu- Q)
ral." You know in real life when a
gush of pain h'its your heart you
don't think how the tears falL
They simply fall and you are occu
pied only with your grief. So on the
stage, when you are posing for the
critical camera eye, you must forget
you are posing. For the time being "
it must be a nose.
(To Be Continued.) l
"
MARY FULLER IS '
Still in her twenlies and is one of
the most popular favorites in fllm
dom. She is of medium height, with
a mass of brown hair that has glints
of copper in it Per brown eyes have
been trained to smile genially or
frown tragically. She is simple and
unspoiled. She leads a life of hard ,
work in New York city, where her
time is spent posing before the cam
era. It is probable that she does
jtwice as much work as the ordinary
star on the legitimate stage, and
then, when she is all through, "rests"
by going to see some show at night
0 o
SAFETY IN GARBAGE CAN
Keep the garbage in tightly-covered
cans so that flies cannot enter and
lay eggs.
If your can is not tight, spray its
contents each day with the following
mixture: Kerosene, 1 quart; crude i?)
carbolic acid, y2 ounce (1 tablespoon- i
ful).
This solution will pre'vent flies from
alighting on the garbage and will de
stroy the eggs and imaggots which
are already in it A metal spray, such
as is used for spraying plants, can be
obtained for this .purpose at a cost of
about 50 cents.
MAaamaMMMMfefeM

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