OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, June 16, 1915, LAST EDITION, Image 11

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1915-06-16/ed-1/seq-11/

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.of five men they named was made
the third man in the arbitration. The
five men named included Ex-Mayor
Harrison and Gov. Dunne. They were
all reliable men.
"But nix said the bosses. That
made it look very plainly that the
bosses did not want a fair deal. They
wanted more than a fair deal. Then
the trust papers played the news so
that it looked as though the bosses
were making all sorts of good moves
and the men turning them all down.
"Eventually the strike was called.
"As a matter of comparison, the
street care men averaged less than
a thousand dollars a year. The trac
tion bosses are getting $50,000 a year
or better.
"Do you blame the men for striking
for their rights?" C. H. M.
REAL MEN. I see we have some
real men in the city council and I
only hope they keep up the good
work that they have started.
The police can handle this strike,
and do not think they need any am-,
munition to shoot down our street'
car men, but if they bring strike--breakers
into this city they may need
it after the strike is over.
They are the lowest of the low and
after the strike they will do more
harm and shoot, rob and give this
city a name it will take years to get
rid of.
The strikebreaker is a rat, and any
one who feeds them or gives them a
place to sleep in are doing more harm
to the cause of labor than they would
if they took a car out of the barn and
run it over the city.
I hope out city council keeps up the
work and looks out for the workers,
for they are the ones who put them
in office and the ones who do not
forget good work. A. W.
THE REAL SITUATION. "Four
teen thousand men and women are
thrown out of work by the order to
strike." Chicago Examiner.
t 'Tb? daily average, haul of cash
fares (not including transfers) on the
surface and elevated lines is in ex
cess of 2,500,000 persons." Chicago
Examiner.
2,500,000 persons a day at 5
cents each $125,000
14,000 men and women at an v
average of $3 pef day 42,000
Balance $83,000
Question Who gets the balance
Answer Why! It costs money to
hold the juice in the, wires, and then,
you see, the current of electricity
travels so fast along the copper
wires that they wear out under the
friction, hence the "overhead" ex
penses are so great Money is not the
whole thing in this world. It's brains.
The subject is very distasteful to me.
Please pass the pickles. A. E. Mas
sey, 2450 Indiana av.
WOMEN JWD TOBACCO. My
grandmother smoked tobacco in a
clap pipe until she died at 92. 1 don't
know when she started, but it was
late in life, to relieve her asthma. I
believe most old people hasten their
death because they fall down stairs
or injure themselves suddenly. At any
rate, my granny did. I believe she
would have reached the 100 mark
had not she fallen, in spite of the to
bacco. I have known many old wom
en who smoked the "weed," but they
were real old. Some six years ago I
met a girl who smoked cigarettes.
She had consumption, as every one
could see. I asked her why she
smoked cigarettes. She replied:
"Look at me. The doctor gives me
two years to live. Shall I enjoy a
little pleasure and die in two years or
shall I be real good and prolong the
agony for another year or so? Shall
I brace up, marry and die in two or
three years, possibly leaving a con
sumptive offspring for my husband
to care for? Would you reformers
deprive the likes of me of all pleas
ures?" Will Miss Lucy Page Gaston an-
swec thjs girL J belief in Keeping
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