OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, June 16, 1915, LAST EDITION, Image 18

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1915-06-16/ed-1/seq-18/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

999mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm
THE LITTLE WORKER
By Grace Benedict Meserve
"I want the house put in complete
order," said Mr. Arnold Rayner; "you
can attend to that.""-
"Rather," returned John Griggs,
with a smile. "I've just the party in
view," and he smiled again. "Every
thing will he done as you order, Mr.
Rayner. We're to glad to have a good
neighbor back with us again to neg
lect making the house just as home
like as possible."
"Thank you," bowed Mr. Rayner,
in his grave, sedate way. "I am glad
to be back among friends. You think
you understand everything?"
"Perfectly," assured Griggs. "The
house is to be cleaned up fromground
to attic, the things moved in when
they come, some energetic girl or
woman on hand to take charge of the
children in case you send them on
ahead. Very good, sir. I will hire a
most trusty lieutenant to assist me
in carrying out all your orders to the
last detail. Good day, sir, and wel
come when you come back for good."
John Griggs stood looking specu
latively after his acquaintance and
client, Mr. Rayner. He had not seen
him for eight years and he speculated
on the change in the brisk, ambitious
young man who had left the village
to marry a city girl and concerning
whom he had heard little until he ap
peared that day. It was to announce
that he had decided to settle down in
Blairsville again. He had taken a
lease of a house for some time va
cant "Four of them self, wife and two
children. They can make a pleasant
home of the old Trevor place."
Then the speaker smiled again, re
calling the direction regarding the
renovation of the house and the rest
of the program. He had spoken of
a "lieutenant." He left his office to
see that individual forthwith.
"My! It will be just the kind of
work Nellie Rogers likes," he solilo- i
quized. "If there ever was a worker
it's Nellie. She'll be glad, too, .for
Mr. Rayner will pay liberally, he
said."
Griggs walked down the street till
he came to an old-fashioned house
with an old-fashioned porch to it, and
the quaintest looking old-fashioned
woman sitting knitting on its top
step Miss Matilda Rogers, spinster.
"Howdy," bobbed Griggs, at famil
iar ease with a person he bad'known
"Happy as a Lark and Right in My
Element"
for forty years. "I want to see your
niece."
"Oh, you do," retorted Miss Matil
dao, snappily. "Well, you won't find
her here."
"Out somewhere tending children,
I suppose?"
"No," answered the lady tartly.
"Shopping, then?"
"Her Nellie? H'm! Not her.
She's been a sore thorn in my flesh,
John, and I'm nigh pestered to death
about her."
"Why, I thought Nellie was the nio-
gggg
3fflfe3?
;Ssfe&
nHmtwiiii
MViiL3teJi ... jrr. . Jk-J. .

xml | txt