OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, June 29, 1915, LAST EDITION, Image 14

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1915-06-29/ed-1/seq-14/

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' "Ann how much did they pay you
1 for the ordeal? It must have been
worth a lot of money to do it like
that!"
"Unfortunately, the salary was
very small She never would have
doae it had I not been ill in a sani
tarium at the time-I am Miss Ed
wards' mother."
"Oh, yes, of course."
Then Miss Edwards spoke for her
self. "Be not ashamed to show what
God was not ashamed to make," is
one of her epigrams. "Sometimes a
naked mind is more indecent than a
naked body.
"it seems to me far more injurious
for some people to undress their evil
thoughts than for others to undress
their beautiful bodies. If I had be
lieved there was anything immoral or
immodest in appearing in 'Hypo
crites,' I never should have done so."
And the reported blushed.
"Anyway, it seems to me the pub
lic is tired of 'The Hypocrites' by
now," said Mrs Edwards. "My
daughter is now in vaudeville show-
-o-
lng the public a new type of inter
pretive dancing."
o o
CREAM OF CUCUMBER SOUP
Peel two fresh cucumbers and dice.
Cover with boiling water and add'
one level teaspoonful of salt and boil
15 minutes; remove pot from fire and
skim out the cucumbers, saving two.
cups of the water in which they were
boiled; blend two tablespoonfuls of
butter with three of flour until free
from lumps, add cucumbers, and the
two cupfuls of water; stir rapidly,
then add three cupfuls of rich milk
and cook all slowly until creamy; add
one level tespoonful of minced par
sley and a dash of nutmeg and serve.
o o
HOUSEHOLD HELPS
Discarded inner auto tubes can be
cut up into the best of rubber bands.
Keep a soap shaker over the kitch
en sink and add to it' all small pieces
of soap. Use for washing dishes.
To remove white spots from furni
ture rub the spot with a flannel cloth
wet with turpentine. Then polish
with a dry cloth.
o-
WATERPROOF LID AND GEISHA HAT ARE VERY
LATEST IDEAS, SAYS BETTY BROWN
BY BETTY BROWN
Since we have so much rain this
summer we have been forced to de
vise some way of beating the weather
San at his own game. As a result
e Waterproof Lid has come into
being and now we simply don't care
how hard it rains.
Miss Sophie Schauls is one of the
exponents of this new anti-wet head
gear. Miss Schauls is famous as the
girl whom, the Fashion Art league
picked as the prettiest mannikin in
America.
According to Mme. Marguerite, the
creator of the fashion idea which is
calculated to make the weather
man ashamed of himself, the
washable sailor is made of the new
glazed chintz and linen. The brim is
faced with linen, which is carried out J
over the top of the brim, making a
binding of about two inches. A white
crown cord drawn loosely around the
crown completes the hat. No matter
how wet it gets this little lid looks as
chic and smart as ever.
There simply is never any telling
at all where little Miss Fashion is
going for her ideas. Now she has
traveled half way round the world'
and ahs landed right in Tokyo,
where the little Geisha girls have
shown her one of the ways by which
they make themselves picturesquely
beautiful Miss Schauls was wearirig
one of the Geishas the other day and
found it very fetching indeed.
"The Geisha hat is made of nat
ural colored linen," Mme. Marguer
ite, whose idea it is, told me, "and it
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