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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, July 20, 1915, NOON EDITION, Image 6

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1915-07-20/ed-1/seq-6/

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THE PUBLIC FORUM
ADVICE TO R. F. C.
By Mrs. H. P.
I noticed your verses Jately,
Simply pining for a change. ,
Vacation seems to Rouble one
If viewed from a wide range.
Since then you seem reconciled,
Too late, I fear this time.
The weather man, awake at last,
Has read your pleading rhyme.
Why don't you take an ocean trip?
Excitement all the way.
When the submarine had passed,
It might be judgment day.
Now if you wish suggestions,
111 offer you this one.
It certainly would be a change
From anything you've done.
But if it don't appeal to you
I'll not feel very bad,
If the submarine did hit you
I'd really feel quite sad.
For you probably would blame me
If you commenced a song,
And found your crown was much too
small,
Your harp was tuned all wrong.
IS VIC PERTURBED? From an
editorial in Saturday Daily News we
infer that Victor Lawson is consid
erably perturbed now that the street
car men are to get a living wage.
This paper attempts to belittle two
courageous and honest public offi
cials, Mayor Thompson and Maclay
Hoyne, who we believe gave a very
fair and impartial hearing to both
sides, and their award has been most
favorably received by all who believe
in decent wages, which will permit
these men's families to have at least
a few comforts and a higher standard
of living. R. F. C.
GOLDEN TEXT, NO. 7 Our Sun
day Visitor, Feb. 11, 1915: "Just as
today the church does not condemn
those who advance as an hypothesis
that the body of man is an evolution
of an inferior organism, but she
would candemn one who today when
proof is lacking, would hold tfil
forth as a certainty." C. H.
REGARDING FASHIONS.! be
lieve an answer is due the article
signed by James McQuire, written ont
"Fashions."
There are several points in Mr.,
McQuire's statement which I do not
believe are consistent For instance
Mr. McQuire infers in his article that
because a man wears a pair of white,
shoes around the streets of dirty,?
sooty cities, there is something thef
matter with his upper story, or, be
cause young people wear a suit or
clothes which may be Palm Beach or,
some other material suitable for the.
weather they would be classed as one
of Darwin's favorite characters; or,,
if people who have advanced inage"
desire to wear clothes that will make
them look younger, the writer of thej
article thinks they are rapidly ap
proaching second childhood In oth-
er words, becoming foolish, or be-,
cause rough, vulgar people (the
writer is at a loss to know what class.
Mr. McQuire refers to) part with bigj
sums of money for silk shirts andt
white silk hose they should be wear
ing corduroy and cotton. Can yau
imagine a man with large sums ofj
money wearing corduroy and cotton ?t
The writer of the article' statea,
ards, -people do not go into saloons
much to spend money to be dnmk-t
ards; instead, they spend their money,
on latest styles in clothing and, he,
Gays, it is difficult to tell which is the,
worse. I would like to ask Mr. M&7
Quire if he were standing on a corner,
and he saw a well-dressed man, in,
silk shirt, white shoes and whitej
shoes, walking along the street, or"
he should see a drunkard staggering-
along in corduroy and cotton, .whpj
would he be likely to -pick out as th
better citizen? Also, where would
prosperity go if we were all to weart
corduroy and cotton clothing which;
would last indefinitely, and cast aaidea
all , latest novelties which look verya
neat and very often are the work rf
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