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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, July 29, 1915, NOON EDITION, Image 5

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1915-07-29/ed-1/seq-5/

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THE DAY BOOK
N. D. COCHRAN
EDITOR AND PUBLISHER,
SOO SO. PEORIA ST. CHICAGO, ILL.
Editorial, Monroe 353
TJ .,...., "uwraii Monroe &
JelepnOneS Circulation. Monroe 383
SUBSCRIPTION By Carrier In Chicago.
10 cents a Month. By Mall. United
States and Canada, $2.00 a Year.
Entered 'as second-clow matter April
21, 1914, at the postolllce at Chicago.
Ill, under the Act of March J, 1879.
FIGHTING FOR HUMANITY.
The Eastland investigation may serve
to convince some doubters of the
value of labor unions to humanity at
large. When the news of the dis
aster reached The Day Book a re
porter was sent at once to get in
touch with officers of the seamen's
union. The reason for this was that
we knew THEY would have accurate
information on the human side of the
steamboat business.
Subsequent events have justifieT
this belief. The Day Book news,
story of Saturday, the day of the
horror, was the first to tell the pub
lic where to place the blame. It was
the first to tell the public the results
of government inspection when the
Eastland sailed out of the port of
Cleveland, and the first to call atten
tion to the fact that officers of the
seamen's union had been watching
lake excursion boats with a view to
the PROTECTION OF HUMAN LIFE,
and had warned YOUR government
at Washington of the very dangers
that finally led to the awful loss of
life in the Chicago river.
For years every possible effort has
been made by members of the sea
men's union to bring about official in
spection and the use of safeguards
to PROTECT HUMAN LIFE.
On the other hand, the efforts ot
owners and their hired men have been
directed toward making greater profit
more. doUaig, Theyhaje fought
i governmental action proposed in the
interest of passengers and crew, be
cause the additional safeguards
would COST MONEY AND CUT
DOWN PROFITS.
Trade unionism does not confine
its humanitarian work to the lakeSj
It is just as watchful and energetic in
demand for reforms on land. It has
led the fight for safety first It has
fought for years for protection to hu
man life in the entire industrial world
not alone the lives of workmen, but
also the lives of ALL people.
It has fought for protection against
occupational disease, against con
sumption and all diseases caused by
unsanitary conditions in workshops
and factories. It has fought for the
protection of motherhood and child
hood, and hence for a higher standard
of American citizenship.
And always its bitterest and most
influential foe has been Organized
Greed bondholders,, stockholders,
presidents, directors, managers,
bankers, merchant princes, captains
of industry, gamblers in food, manu
facturers' associations, chambers of.
commerce, employers of labor and,
Organized Capitalism in general.
The line of demarcation has been
sharply drawn. On the one side was
Organized Labor fighting for human
ity, and on the other Organized Cap
ital fighting for profit
Nobody believes that any of the
owners or managers of any steam
ship WANTS disaster and death. No
body believes that any government
official wants anybody to lose life
because of lack of proper preventive
measures.
But in the eyes of owners there
was profit ahead; and preventative
measures cut down profit And own
ers took a chance. Their eyes were
blinded by their GREED. Business is
business.
And with public officials well, it is
much easier and pleasanter to please
powerful and influential citizens than
to cross them and earn their enmity.'
So after all it is the .SYSTEM;
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