OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, August 07, 1915, LAST EDITION, Image 13

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1915-08-07/ed-1/seq-13/

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EYEOGRAPHY! LIFE STORY OF $26,000 EYES
HOW THEY BROUGHT FORTUNE TO OWNER
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The $26,000 pair of eyes. They belong to Clara Kimball Young, onei
of the highest salaried and most beautiful moving picture stars in the world.
, BY MILTON BRONNER
BIOGRAPHY is the story of a
human being's life.
EYEOGRAPHY is the story of the
life and adventures of Clara Kimball
Young, one of the highest-priced and
most beautiful movie stars in film
dom, because any account of her be
gins and ends with her dazzling eyes.
They made her a favorite when she
was 4. They got her a job as a stock
actress when she badly wanted one.
And they shot her up in the ranks of
the film stars from a $25 per week
actress to one who draws down con
siderably in excess of $500 per week
regularly now. Hence the word
"Eyeography."
Miss" Young, who is the daughter of
Edward M. Kimball and Pauline Mad
dern, both actors, was born in Chi
cago and spent part of her early life
in Goldfield, Nev., when that Nat
Goodwinized town enjoyed a brief
gold boom.
There, at the age of 5,- she made
her debut in "Peck's Bad Boy," and
$0 tickled was the rough audience of
miners with her pretty face and her
big brown eyes that they insisted up
on a song.
Little Clara, nothing loath, re
sponded, and for the rest of the even
ing she was the star of the show.
When she finished school she was
living in Seattle. The manager of
Gabriel Frawley's stock company
took one look at Clara's eyes and
said "You are engaged." Then she
came on to New York in 1911 looking
for a position.
For the first time in her young life
she was refused a chance. She then
went to Philadelphia, where at once
she secured a $100 a week place with
the Orpheum Players
Some one, struck by her beauty,
told her she should go into the mov
ies, even though at first she might
make less money. She took the ad
vice and dropped her $100 job for $25
a week in the films.
It was not long before people began
to rave about her good looks. And
every rave added dollars to her pay
check. Lillian Russell declared her
the most beautiful movie actress
alive. Penrhyn Stanlaws, the fam
ous artist, said she had the mosi lus
J?A "L
.Sc.

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