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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, August 17, 1915, LAST EDITION, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1915-08-17/ed-1/seq-4/

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SZE&ESSiSmEIESEBm
iQ GLOVEMAKERS STRIKE
FOR RIGHT TO ORGANIZE
Two patrol wagon loads of police
men rolled up in front of the West
Side Auditorium this morning. A
crowd gathered in front There was
a rumor of a riot inside.
What really was going on in the
auditorium was that 200 glovemakers
from the Herzog factory, 12th and
Throop sts., were holding a strike
meeting. There was no disorder, not
even a loud voice. The request for
the police had come from the Herzog
factory. It was said the Herzog peo
ple were hopeful the police would
break up the meeting, but when they
found out what a peaceful thing it
was the police retreated with an apol
ogy. The 250 girls who make gloves at
Herzog factory have been getting
33 1-3 cents for 144 leather gloves
and 22 cents a gross for leather mitts.
When the girls started whispering
unionism to better their conditions
Minnie Gail and Nellie Alitou were
dropped from the company's payroll.
Saturday the girls held a meeting
at the Palace opera house, 12th st
and Blue Island av. Celia Goodman
was spokesman.
Yesterday Miss Goodman entered
the workroom. "I'm fired," she said.
The girls laid down the work and
started for the door. Maurice Cohgri,
foreman, stood in the only door and
tried to keep them from going out,
but they pushed him aside.
This morning the girls met with
Elizabeth Christman, secretary of
Local 18, Woman Glovemakers'
union. They formulated demands
for more pay, shorter hours, better
treatment and the doing away with
the system of salary reduction.
At the Herzog factory the girls are
docked weekly for imperfect gloves.
In other factories the gloves are re
turned to the girl for fixing.
C. J. Stone, Herzog foreman, prom
ised to meet a committee of the girls
this afternoon.
About 50 of the girls have returned
to work.
o o
TROOPER KILLED, TWO WOUND
ED, IN MEXICAN RAID
Brownsville, Tex., Aug. 17. A
United States cavalryman was killed
and two were wounded when seventy
Mexicans crossed the river near
Santa Maria last night The Mexi
cans were repulsed, but their losses
are unknown. Another clash is ex
pected hourly.
The cavalryman killed in last
night's battle was Corp. Wihnan.
Lieut Roy 0. Henry and Trooper
Jackson were wounded. All were
members of Troop C, Twelfth cav
alry. "PLEASE, LADIES WITH THIN
GOWN, KEEP AWAY"
Youngstown, O., Aug. 17. "I ask
beautiful ladies with transparent
gowns and perfect shapes to stay
away from my market when the sun
is shining, for it costs me money for
the clerk's time that he spends in
taking a look."
The above is part of an advertise
ment Geo. Oles, butcher, this after
noon wrote for the Youngstown eve
ning papers.
"It is soon going to be so cool that
you will have to quit wearing lingerie
or die of pneumonia," continues the
ad.
o o
LAWSON MAY GET NEW TRIAL
Denver, Aug. 17. The Colorado
supreme court today issued a writ of
prohibition against Judge Granby
Hillyer acting in three coatl strikers'
cases.
A writ of supersedeas was issued
staying the execution of life sentence
on John R. Lawson, strike leader con
victed of murder in connection with
a private guard's death. Both sides
were ordered to file briefs by Septem
ber on the question of a new trial
for Lawson, who will remain n Trin
idad jail temporarily. v -
,)
gg

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