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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, August 28, 1915, LAST EDITION, Image 18

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1915-08-28/ed-1/seq-18/

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MAIDA'S WOOER
By H. M. Egbert
Maida stood still andl looked at the
' black object uponthe beach. At first
she thought it was a seal, washed
' ashore after the great storm that had
. whipped up the shingle in great ridges
all around the lighthouse rock. Then
she saw that it was a man.
She held her breath in terror. Pres
ently she ventured to draw nearer.
j It was a young man, with dark hair
. and a pale face, the tan of the neck
ending in a V where the open shirt
, collar disclosed the white of the skin
teneath.
For a moment Maida did not know
' what to do. Then, moved by corn
Hussion, she knelt beside him and
rested his head upon her knees while
she tried to revive him, chafing his
hands and dashing sea water upon his
face.
All the while her heart beat furi
ously. She had never seen a man be
fore except some occasional sea cap
tain, grizled and bowed, who rowed
out to the lonely lighthouse, and the
man who brought oil and provisions
in his motorboat.
Maida's mother had kept the light
house ever since Maida was born.
She had lived there alone, tending the
light ceaselessly, a worn and shriv
eled, hard-featured, taciturn old
woman, who seldom spoke.
She had bought books and taught
her daughter to read and write. Often
Maida had spoken of her desire to
see the world outside; hut the very
suggestion aroused the mother's
fury to such a degree that Maida had
come at last to acquiesce in her lot
as inevitahla
The sea captains, though they
looked at her pityingly, had been
afraid of the grim old woman whose
loneliness had turned her brain. They
spoke to Maida hurriedly, and always
watched to avoid the old lighthouse
keeper's anger.
The young man opened a pair of
dazingly blue eyes on Maida.
"Am I dead and are you a fairy?"
he asked.
"No," answered Maida. "This is
Inch Rock."
He groaned. "I remember," he
muttered. "Let me see if Lean stand."
She helped him to his feet and
stood beside him, watching anxiously.
No bones were broken. But he was
very weak and the chopping sea made
She Held Her Breath in Terror
any thought of putting out impossi
ble. "If mother finds you she will kill
me," said the girl.
"Why?" inquired the young man,
regajfcng her curiously.
"STC hates men. She never means
me to marry or see a man. Oh
don't know what to do," sobbec
Maida.
"Isn't there some place where
can hide until an opportunity cornea .'
ifor going away? asked the man,

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