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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, September 11, 1915, LAST EDITION, Image 8

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1915-09-11/ed-1/seq-8/

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SAYS WORKERS HAVE REACHED
END OF THEIR PATIENCE
"Conditions under which clothing
workers of Chicago are compelled to
work are so bad that a general strike
involving about 50,000 men and
women appears to be a certainty
within a short timeunless manufac
turers make concessions."
This statement was issued today
under the pen of Frank Rosenblum,
board member Amlg. Clothing Work
ers of America.
Amlg. Clothing Workers will hold
two mass meetings at 7:30 p. m. next
Tuesday for the purpose of approving
demands upon manufacturers. They
will be staged at Hod Carriers' hall,
Harrison and Green sts., and Wicker
Park hall, 2040 W. North av., near
Robey. International Pres. Sidney
Hillman and others of prominence
will speak.
The probable demands will be a liv
ing wage, 48-hour week, recognition
of the union and the abolishment of
blacklisting agencies and fining sys
tems. Meanwhile the Ladies' Waist, Dress
and White Goods Workers' Interna
tional union is making ready for a
general strike that will likely be
called at about the same time as that
of the Amalgamated. These are not
rival unions. The Amalgamated con
trols the workers who make men's
apparel, the other the workers who
make women's wear.
Mattress makers are still on strike
and raincoat makers are still consid
ering the possibility of a general
strike against all non-union plants.
o o
TELEGRAPHERS GET INCREASE
United States Mediator G. W. Han
ger and Pres. H. B. Perham of the
Order of Railroad Telegraphers ef
fected a settlement Friday by which
the telegraphers of the Great West
ern road get a 6 per cent increase.
The telegraphers took a strike vote
in April In August Hangar jvas call
ed in. Now everything is O. K. 400
men were affected. j
JOBLESS, BROKE, BEAUTIFUL
THE EASIEST WAY
No work. Not a friend in the city.
Broke. No place to sleep. Not a
thing to eat lor days. Starved until
it seemed your stomach would come
through the ribs in its demand for
food. Picture yourself all of this and
pretty on top. What would you do?
Pearl Eraskey told the police she
entered alleged dive, 30 N. Sangamon,
because there was nothing else to
keep her from starvation.
After girl had told her story, Mrs. i T
Sarah Santag was arrested for pan- .
dering.
What's going to happen to Pearl?
Don't know, but most such girls can't
do much of anything but go back to
earning money in nefarious manner
or else start starving again.
WAITERS' UNION PROTEST MAY
STOP SOLDIERS WAITING
Soldiers are going to be used as
table waiters at the Ft Sheridan ci
vilian military camp unless the pro
test of waiters' union is heeded.
Waiters' Local No. 35 has by reso
lution declared that it is not the
seeming duty of Uncle Sam's trained
fighters to don a white apron and
carry food for business men and their
hirelings who are going to take the
military course. They feel that the
use of soldiers to compete with union
waiters, is an encroachment upon the
rights of free labor.
MAN HAS SENSATIONAL TRIP
THROUGH 12-INCH- PIPE
New York, Sept 11. Dragged in
by the rushing water, Samuel Lash of
New York was carried 250 feet in 12,
seconds through a 12-inch outlet
pipe from an Allenhurst, N. J., bath
ing pool into the Atlantic ocean yes
terday. In his hideous trip both of Lash's .-
arms were broken at the shoulder, his V-i
collarbone fractured, the skin was
torn and scraped from almost his en
tire body and sand was ground into
his flesh.
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