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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, September 15, 1915, LAST EDITION, Image 8

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1915-09-15/ed-1/seq-8/

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CHILD BEATING CHARGES MADE
AGAINST CHILDREN'S HOME
Beating of children -with, garden
hose and spanking of two-year-old
babies with wooden paddles are
charges made against caretakers and
nurses of Central baptist Children's
home, Maywood. Result is decision
to oust the entire staff of employes.
The Curran legislative committee has
investigated. i
One boy said his mouth was tied
shut because he talked too much.
Girls said they had been whaled with
a piece of garden hose till they cried
for mercy. A boy told how when the
boys were lined up for good-night
prayers a teacher would beat them
with the hose while they said the
Lord's prayer.
"Oliver Twist had nothing on us,"
said one lad.
Persons held responsible are Sup't
Donald MacGillivray and his wife and
daughter, Miss Laura Pratt' Hull,
caretaker, and Miss Jennie Newell,
babies' nurse. Miss Hull admitted
that she had whipped boys in bed
" without their clothes on.
o o
MALTER HAS STOPPED PAYMENT
ON THOSE CHECKS
Max Malter, the boss dyer who paid
$100 to Wm. J. Riordan to bust the
dye house workers' union, has "pro
tested" his two checks at the State
Bank of Chicago.
Two weeks ago, when The Day
Book printed photographs of the
checks, a Day Book reporter took the
checks to the bank. The cashier said
the signature was Max Maker's and
that Riordan could have the money
any time he wanted it; And now Max
Malter has stopped payment
Malter is secretary of the Tailors,
Cleaners & Dyers' ass'n, 3836 N.
Clark sL Riordan is president of Dye
House Workers, 14,190. When Malter
paid the checkB Riordan took them
to Emmet Flood, organized for the
American Federation of Labor, who
gave them to The Day Book for pub
lication. - .
MAYBE THEY'LL MAKE NINE R. I.
OFFICIALS COME THROUGH ,
Wouldn't It be funny if the nine di-
rectors of the Rock Island railroad,
from which $6,000,000 was1 looted,
had to dig down in their jeans and
make good the coin?
Federal Judge Carpenter yesterday
entered suit against the nine R, L di
rectors, charging them with mulcting
the company when the road was1 sep
arated from the 'Frisco systenj and
asking them ,tp refund the money.
ii a man attempts a confidence
game on Si Halsted st. and get caught
he will go td-the Bridewell
When the city threatened to take
over the automatic, telephone system
under terms of a contract between
the company and the city the, -bankers
howled about poor widows losing
their investments. t t
But who has noticed bankers shed-v
ding tears because the Rock Island
was juggled and pilf ered by'flnanbiars
until it went broke and swept' away
the little hordes of widows and small
investors? . .,
HOW ABOUT THIS? .'
Why does John Ford get all of the
court reporting in probate courts
The work is worth $25,000 a year.-,.
Outside court reporters say thla
should be an open job and that 'any
attorney should oe privileged to 'use
his own reporter. Court officials do -not
deny this. But lawyers say that
when they bring in their ownvreport
ers that they always seem toget slowtr
action from court officials. - . ' H.
In 1913 John Cervenka probate'
court clerk, obtained an official coiirt"
reporter, pledging the county should'!,
receive one-fourth of, the fees. There ?
seems to be no record of an such '
fees being paid. ' "fl -
o ch " s
HE AND SHE a
She Have you ever read ''Lives of
the Hunted?" V ,
He No; what's it about bached"
lore? ftew York Post. " "?
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