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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, September 17, 1915, LAST EDITION, Image 3

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1915-09-17/ed-1/seq-3/

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WHY ARE SOME OF CHICAGO'S COPPERS?
HERE IS WHY SOME OF THEM SHOULDN'T BE!
'BY H. M. COCHRAN
Shades of Cossacks!
What chance has a slip of a "tough
little kid" got against an army oi
walking and riding Chicago cops?
None at all, as was shown in a little
Incident that started Thursday aft
ernoon, at the Randolph street, en
trance of the City HalL
The "paddy" wagon of the St
Charles' home for juveniles was just
about ready to pull out with its load
of "dangerous juveniles" when one
young fellow, who looked about 14,
jumped out the back door and made
a break for freedom. The speed he
attained as he made for the alley be
tween the Palace and. Cohan's the
aters was evidence enough that he
was not keen on going to the juvenile
'home. '
The officer in charge of the "pad
dy" wagon took up the chase and
was shortly joined by a small armyf A
cops and a couple of hundred curious
pedestrians.
The odds were too great and the
"tough little kid'' was collared on
Dearborn street by a "rough and
ready" copper. If the "tough little
kid" had had on a size 16 collar in
stead of a isy2, the copper's hand
would -have fit in better and the
"tough little kid's" face would not
have grown so terribly red. Neither
would he have pleaded' to be allowed
to breathe.
The curious crowd followed close
as the return trip to the "paddy"
wagon was made. The "tough little
kid" said nothing. He didn't make
good at his getaway and that was all
there was to it to him. Three or four
other coppers insisted 'on getting a
hand in on the "tough little kid."
Just as the crowd-came out of the
aleyway one of Chicago's prize
- rmnjitpd rops broke his horse into a
run and dashed into the crowd. It
was .simply taking advantage-otthfiir.
authority. It was rotten police work.
It was bully tactics.
The crowd broke and spread out
of the horseman's way. Nobody was
hurt; just scared. And the mounted
and street cops laughed.
The "tough little kid" was loaded
back in the St Charles "paddy" wa
gon while a crowd, cheered his game
ness. The "brave" coppers 'sulked
away.
The "paddy" wagon pulled out for
the juvenile home at St Charles.
"Gimme a pill, somebody," yelled the
"tough little kid" as he stuck his arm
out the window of the "paddy" wa
gon. He was running his other hand
around inside of his collar. Coppers'
brawny hands don't feel good on
one's neck.
LYMAN E. COOLEY CAN KISS
$7,000 PER YEAR GOOD-BY
About a year ago Lyman E. Cooley,
chief consulting engineer of the san
itary district, signed a report telling
the trustees of the district board hoyr
to run the publicly-owned light and
power plant at Lockport
Rates for light and power ought to
be raised. The plant was not paying
its way. So said Cooley.
Trustes Clark and Paullin attacked
the Cooley report as full of bum
steers, garbled figures and punk eco
nomics. Also they stated the Cooley
report would be a dandy for any cor
porations like the Commonwealth.
Edison to circulate where public own
ership was to be slandered.
That's history. The news is that
ihe sanitary district board yesterday
officially tied a can to Lyman Cooley
and he is now separated from the
$7,000-a-year job, in which he served
with advantage to the light trust
John Ericson, city engineer, and
Wm. Artingstall, assistant, were co
signers of the Cooley report recotn
mending the city's light cost "be
I raised, r
- ' niiitMimiwmmmmmamm

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