OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, October 19, 1915, LAST EDITION, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1915-10-19/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

WPi
played bruises on her arms your at
titude Would be different,". 'he said.
Starting outhfs resolutions Buck
calls the methods of the department
wrong in handling strikes. He found:
That "an undefined and uninten
tional feud exists between all strikers
and policemen.
That the clothing bosses unable to
rely on the police department, have
hired guards and sluggers to "pro
tect" themselves.
That the private guards co-operated
with the police.
That the general attitude of the po
lice could only be expected to result
in the rough handling of strikers on
slight provocation.
That, according to testimony, par
tisanship was expressed by the police.
Also patrolmen used offensive lan
guage to girl strikers.
That the police rode their horses
and motorcycles on the sidewalks at
the slightest provocation.
That detectives in plain clothes
aided the uniform men.
That policewomen, incognito, at
tended meetings to spy on what oc
curred. That the representatives of only
one side the employers' side were
in conferenc with th chief of police.
Based on these findings Buck will
fight to get the council to pass the
following resolutions:
That it being undignified for the
city to permit any other police than
its own to keep the peace, that no pri
vate policing of strikes or lockouts Be
allowed.
That if such special plice be needed
they be added to tie regular force.
That a strike bureau be created,
consisting of officers indorsed by la
bor leaders to study strikes and meth
ods of policing strikes in other cities.
That uch a board co-operate with
the regular labor leaders with the
view of overcoming the hostile feel
ing which exists between the two.
That the chief call both sides of the
controversy into his office before a
strike or lockout
That a certain number of pickets
be allowed at each plant and that the
plants- shall be policed by a number
determined by the chief and the em
ployers. That picketing be allowed under
police protection with the number of
police fixed by the unions and the
chief.
That no members of the police de
partment attend meetings of the
unions Incognito.
That no plain clothes men be al
lowed to do strike duty.
That the theoretical impartiality
of the police between the employers
and strikers be made .real.
That no persons on either side of
industrial controversies be allowed to
carry arms.
That uniform resembling police
men be prohibited.
That the police be forbid to dis
cuss strikes while on such duty.
And that the language used by the
members of the department be in
vestigated and the rule against ob
scene language be enforced.
Alderman Kennedy's resolution is
very much similar to Buck's. He will
also introduce his into the council
o o
MANY HURT IN JOLIET WRECK
Three trainmen and two passen
gers fatally injured and score seri
ously hurt when Alton road commut
er train ran into open switch at Jo
liet Of 300 passengers on train few
escaped without cuts or bruises. The
trainmen were dug from the ruins of
demolished, locomotive. They were
terribly scalded. Coaches did not
leave tracks.
MAYOR AND ALDERMEN BACK
Mayor Thompson arrived back
from -his self-booming trip through
the west at noon today. Henchmen
and city hall employes went to Min
neapolis and accompanied him back
on a special train. A big delegation
of "drys" met him at the station. With
him came the aldermen.
,4fcMMMtariBnAAMfkaadaAjk
o
i

xml | txt