OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, January 12, 1916, NOON EDITION, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1916-01-12/ed-1/seq-2/

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He used figures which the report
of big business, paid for by the rail
roads, used, and be got different re
sults. He says the railroads can
electrify at least they can start
something at a small cost
He then says that: --. .
The investigation of theAss'n of
Commerce proves the railroads con
tribute to the pollution of Chicago
air.
There are others belching smoke
into Chicago's air, but that doesn't
excuse the railroads.
Electrification will decrease the
amount of soot in Chicago.
Either total or partial electrifica
tion is practicable by the railroads.
Railroads under electricity will be
cheaper to operate, will be more re
liable and safe.
Electrification will add to cleanli
. ness and healthf ulness of the city.
Operation under electricity will
make the city more beautiful and
permit a freer growth of vegetation.
Then Reid goes on to show that
during the ten years which it would
take the railroads to electrify the
cost wil be less than 3 per cent of
their income per year.
He shows that the City Railways
Co., "although this company has to
take care of a large over-capitalization,"
can still afford to donate to
the city almost 8 per cent of its in
come. Then he winds up with:
"Now will the railroads make this
small annual expenditure in order to
make the city cleaner, healthier,
more attractive, and a more fitting
place to live in for themselves, their
children and others, as well as to
reap the financial benefits of, well-invested
capital, or will they keep fos
tering dirt and filth and remain a
nuisance until compelled to divest
themselves from-it?"
o o
Two women said they were robbed
by two men in Harrison & Anderson's
saloon, 6311 N. Clark. Mayor revok
ed license.
CHAMPAGNE BATTLE SUNDAY
COST 25,000 GERMANS
Paris.- Germans lost more than
25,000 men in Sunday onslaughts
against French lines in Champagne,
according to Chalons dispatches to
day describing battle as bloodiest on
western front since allied offensive
last September.
Great numbers of wounded Ger
man prisoners have reached Chalons.
They confirm report that Gen. Von
Eimen planned to break through the
French line and bend back whole
front from Rheims to Verdun.
Rome. Early fall of Cettinje, Mon
tenegrin capital, forecasted in dis
patches received here today confirm
ing news that Austrians have occu
pied Mount Lowcen, "Gibraltar of the
Adriatic,55 dominating roads to Cet
tilnje and less than 7 miles away.
Military evacuation of King Nich
olas' capital began on Sunday. This
news preceded toessage from Berne,
Switzerland, reporting fall of Mount
Lowcen.
Arsenal at Cettinje has been dis
mantled and everything of military
value removed. Preparations were
being made Sunday to transfer cap
ital, but new seat of government has
not been selected. On all fronts the
Austrians are striking hard blows at
valiant little Montenegrin army,
which is handicapped both by lack
of equipment and by need of food
supplies.
Mount Lowcen fell after 5 days of
terrific and uninterrupted bombard
ment from Austrian squadron in Cat
taro harbor. Harbor forts and lighter
Austrian artillery brought up to
close range.
o o
Mrs. Katherine Kievit, said to have
deserted her children, and David
Clink, son of attorney, both -of Mus
kegon, Mich., arrested in room at 1
E. Illinois and booked on serious
charge.
Reynold Drews, driver auto truck
which killed Mrs. Ellen Murphy, 1102
W. Garfield blvd., exonerated by jury.

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