OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, January 17, 1916, NOON EDITION, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1916-01-17/ed-1/seq-4/

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ropms of thei restranged wives to get T pressed the first edition, and seven
divorce evidence, both said,
Judge Uhlir says it would not do
for woman to be judge of morals
court, as testimony she would have
to hear would be too unfit
Mrs. Ella Flagg--Young, former
sup't of Chicago schools, celebrated
71st birthday yesterday in new home,
Los Angeles. Got many telegrams.
Says she is under contract to write
a book.
SENSATIONS MAY BE SPRUNGAT
SANGER TRIAL TUESDAY
New York, Jan. 17. The trial of
Mrs. Margaret H. Sanger will begin
tomorrow in the federal building be
fore Federal Judge Clayton, where
she will be called upon to answer
charges of disseminating literature
advocating birth control Mrs. San
ger has refused to have any counsel,
despite advice of her friends, and is
going to plead her own case.
At a dinner tonight at the Hotel
Brevoort, at which will be present a
number of her friends,. Mrs. Sanger
expects to explain what her case will
be in the trial.
At her home at No. 26 Post av.,
Mrs. Sanger gave a reporter a history
of the case and told what she in
tends to do.
"I found out," she said, "in my
nursing experience so many facts
about the overcrowding of children
and condition of mother and the chil
dren that I thought something
should be done.
"I studied abroad and came back
with my mind made up to give to the
United States the benefit of my ex
perience. I found that nowhere in
this country were there any facts re
lative to the social problems as ap
plied to large families or population.
"I was astonished at this, and it
was then that I began to publish the
Woman Rebel in order to call atten
tion to the conditions, and addressed
it to ihe working women of America.
The publication seemed innecus to
jae, but the postal authorities sup- i here.'
editions out of nine were suppressed
and confiscated because they discuss
ed the mdst innocent side of the subject
"If, as charged, my discussion of
the subject came under section 211
of the obscenity law, then that sec
tion should be done away with. It is
too vital a question to have it come
under the law of obscenity, which is
used to end vile and obscene litera
ture. The legislators themselves
practice birth control, but will not al
low other to know about it
"Because a thing is dangerous for
a few, is that any reason why it
should be kept from the majority? I
know that knowledge in the hands
of the working girl changes her from
a silly, giggling girl to a woman able
to take care of herself. Women of
the underworld have the wrong
knowledge and ignorance is respon
sible for it If they could know it
would be different"
Mrs. Rose Pastor Stokes, interest
ed in Mrs. Sanger's defense, said to
a reporter:
"The qeustion has interested me
very much. Every one knows that
well-to-do people are breaking the
law regarding birth control all the
time and the legislators themselves
join in that They cannot understand
thai everybody does not know how
to control and restrict birth. An
overwhelming majority of people
cannot get the knowledge.
"We see the result in over-increasing
numbers of children, most of
whom die. By the time the ones who
die have been buried, with the con
sequent expense, nothing is left for
the others to live on and they are
starved and miserable. I think that
birth control would regulate and
end this. Europe is an open field for
this and every one understands it
and over there is has been proved
that the right people do not use their
knowledge in the wrong way. I think
it would work out the some way over
m

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