OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, January 26, 1916, NOON EDITION, Image 12

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1916-01-26/ed-1/seq-12/

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TALKS TOO MUCH WIFE HAS
HIM IN COURT
There is just one trouble with Hen
ry Ginter, 2G00 Carmen av. other
wise he's all righ admitted his wife,
who had him in the court of domes
tic relations on a.non-support war
rant. -
He pays the rent, he keeps up the
light bill and he fills the larder, ad
mitted Mr. Mary Ginter as she
looked with baleful eye at Henry,
who is under 5 feet tall.
"What's the reason you brought
him into court under these condi
tions?" asked Judge Hopkins se
verely. "He talks too much," said Mary.
"Why don't you talk back to him?"
asked the judge. '
"She does," said Henry. "She is
Polish and I'm German, and she says
things to me in Polish that I can't
tell what she's saying."
At the end of five minutes Judge
Hopkins conceded Henry's conver
sational ability and advised Mrs. Gin
ter to take lessons, so she could
catch up with him. Henry dis
charged. Mrs. Jos. Drufke, 1744 Girard st,
said her husband hadn't worked
steady for two years, while she has
been supporting the family. Joseph,
however, said he helped his wife with
the coats she made and did the
housework.
Continued until Feb. 2 for Joe to
get a regular job.
o o
TO MAKE PROTEST TO ENGLAND
ON TRADE RESTRICTIONS
Washington, Jan. 26. Diplomatic
problems between Europe's warring
powers and U. S. multiplied today.
Administration has practically
drafted protest to England opposing
British restrictions upon American
"trading with the enemy." England
is to be told in vigorous and unequiv
ocal terms that this government will
not recognize as legal British law
disturbing commercial relations of
American firms or corporations
which have German interests. Ad
ministration will not question Eng
land's right to apply law to her own
corporations and citizens.
o o
WOMAN WHO ELOPED PLEADS
FOR NEGRO PARAMOUR
Salt Lake City, Utah, Jan. 26.
Mrs. Viola Hood, wife of San Diego,
Cal., hotel proprietor, who eloped
here with William Dodds, mulatto
porter at her husband's hotel, said
here she is willing to return to San
Diego "to face the music" if author
ities will permit the mulatto to go to
Chicago.
Mrs. Hood seemed unconcerned
wken told her husband was coming
to Salt Lake City. Hood will not be
permitted to see Dodds for fear of
violence.
The mulatto gave himself up to the
authorities here, denying that he had
coerced Mrs. Hood into following
him. The woman corroborated his
story, saying she loved Dodds and
planned to marry him in Chicago.
A negro chauffeur who was en
gaged by Mrs. Hood had read of the
elopement and drove her to the po
lice station when she asked to go to
her hotel.
PLAN "ADVANCED TO REDUCE
" MINERS' DELEGATES
Indianapolis, Ind., Jan. 26. With
constitutional committee of United
Mine Workers of America aboqt to
report to the convention it was un
derstood that radical recommenda
tions have been made to committee
for cutting down number of delegates
to convention.
' About 1,500 delegates are attend
ing this convention. Indiana miners
from West Terre Haute are under
stood to favor cutting this number to
about 100. The administration's plan '
is to have one delegate for every
1,000 miners, or about 400 delegates.
Illinois miners favor administration
plan.

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