OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, January 26, 1916, NOON EDITION, Image 19

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1916-01-26/ed-1/seq-19/

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"Well, Wykoff, I've put the deal
through."
"You mean you have secured the
goods?"
"Exactly that," gloated Slews. "I
have induced two big wholesale firms
to start us in the jewelry business
with a $5,000 stock."
"But the pay how did you man
age it?"
"On 30, 60 and 90 days' time,"
grinned Slews. "We won't even
open the. store. You and I will go
there this evening, get rid of Bennie
and put all the jewelry in a big burial
box, ship it to Canada and our cred
itors will hold the bag."
That afternoon Bennie was con
siderably surprised as some valuable
deliveries were made at the store.
He peered into some of the parcels
jewelry, and valuable at that. Later
a great long burial box' was delivered.
Just as dusk Slews and Wykoff ap
peared. "Bennie," spoke the former, pulling
down the street shades, "you have
been very diligent. "We'll give you
an evening off. Here is a dollar, go to"1
the movies and enjoy yourself."
"Thank you, sir," bowed Bennie
and sped away as if on wings of de
light, but it was only to go around
the block, and, returning by way of
a cross lot, he stationed himself near
a rear window through which he
could look in directly upon the opera
tions of the schemers.
They proceeded to remove the cov
er from the big board box. Into it
they dumped clocks, watches, vases,
rings. They laughed and chatted in
high glee, then Slews tacked a tag
to the cover of the box. Then they
went away, after putting out all of
the lights and securely locking up the
place.
"Now it's my turn!" soliloquized
Bennie and he was soon inside the
store. He read the address on the.
box. "I see," he observed, "bound
for Canada and may be back any mo
ment with an expressman. Well, I'll 1
let them go, but I've got to work
quickly."
It was two hours later when Slews
and Wykoff returned and, as Bennie
had guessed, had an expressman with
them. The great box was loaded on
the wagon. It was taken to the rail
road station. The schemers saw It
placed in the express car and took
the same train.
As it approached the Canadian bor
der a Customs officer came through
the train.
"Your box ahead there?" he in
luired of Slews.
"Yes," was answered promptly.
"Any mourners?"
"Oh, they will be along later," ex
plained Wykoff.
"Yes," chuckled Slews, in an aside
" in thirty, sixty and ninety days!"
There were some anxious visitors
at the store next day, representa
tives of the concerns that had fur
nished the stock. Bluntly Bennie
told them that Slews and Wykoff had
transferred the same to Canada.
"I've something to tell you," Ben
nie said to Doctor Grimm the next
day. "That jewelry didn't go in that
big box."
"It didn't?" queried his aged
friend.
"No, I took it out It's full of coal,
rocks and old junk that will be my
revenge when those skeesickses
come to open it in Canada.
"But where is the jewelry?" asked
the astonished doctor.
"It's hidden in the corner of the
basement down stairs," explained
Bennie. "I've got my revenge now
for my brother's four hundred dol
lars." "I don't understand?" voiced the
simple-minded old man.
"Well, I'm going to see the two
houses Slews and Wykoff swindled.
I'm going to ask them how much they
-will give to get back their jewelry. I
want you to come with me.
The creditors looked eager, sus
picious, hopeful all at once as Bennia

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