OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, February 18, 1916, LAST EDITION, Image 12

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1916-02-18/ed-1/seq-12/

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champion, among champions,home by
three 'yards in a special 500-yard
event, scheduled as a Central Ama
teur Athletic union title race. The
winner's tune was 6:18 3-5, three sec
onds slower than the record held by
McGillivray.
As a kid prowling the dark waters
off the Barbadoes, "Brown swam all
distances from 100 yards to 10 miles.
After a long course of trainingaround
Bridgetown he came alone to Chicago
in 1914, joined the Central Y. M. C. A.
1 away for Brown in 49:54.
This aquatic marvel, who works
daily in a department store within
Chicago's loop, trains at night. He
has on several occasions threatened
the world's mile record of 23:40 3-5,
established nine year ago by Charles
M. Daniels of the New York A. G.
Newest Sensation Among Natators
Took First Lesson in Barbadoes and
Bids for World's Title.
and went in for a special schooling
under Coach Harry Hazelhurst
Brown was art apt pupil from the
start He knew nothing of the crawl
stroke used by the crack speed swim
mers, but mastered this style in a
month.
Early in 1915 he enrolled with the
Hamilton club and competed with
success in every race of any distance,
appearing in the Marathon swims at
Memphis, Cincinnati, St Louis and
Chicago.
The Memphis Mississipi river grind
at eight miles resulted in a walk-
CONSUMERS' CO. PROFITS BIG
DESPITE WEATHER MAN
Consumers' Co., the coal and ice
trust of Chicago, earned a profit of a
dollar apiece off every man, woman
and child in Chicago last year and
then some.
Annual report of Pres. Fred Up
ham says gross profits were $3,298,
521. Take out fromxthis all the high
salaries of the officers and the not-so-high
wages of the truck drivers and
teamsters, slip $50,887 to the news
papers and billboards for advertising,
shp $319,775 to bankers and bond
holders for interest, and take out a
nifty sum for "depreciation and re
pairs," and the balance for dividends
is $304,500. '
So it looks like the coal and ice
game is not so bad. And the charity
bureau of Consumers' Co. hasn't
given away so much coal to the poor
people that the company is going
bust,
Among directors are Morris S. Ro
senwald, the millionaire garment
manufacturer; Seymour Morris, a
lawyer who represents the Leiter es
tate r William Wrlgley, the chewing
gum king, who tells us to "look for
the spear;" John P. Hopkins, former
mayor and also a heavy stockholder
in People's Gas and Commonwealth
Edison; and P. S. Peabody, head of a
mining company.
Explaining why profits dropped as
compared with previous years, Up
ham says 1915 had "the warmest
February since 1882 and the warmest
April in the history of the weather,
bureau and the coldest May, June, Jir-'
ly and August since 1875. Our ice
business alone showed a decrease of
40 per cent"
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