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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, February 26, 1916, LAST EDITION, Image 3

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1916-02-26/ed-1/seq-3/

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r&t-A -r'-?'56
iflence against Miss Miller and said
they had held her for "investigation."
Judge Heap let her go.
Meanwhile her friend had been
making efforts to find her. He sent
Att'y Edwin G. Lancaster on the trail
of the missing woman. Lancaster
found her after the court proceedings
were over. He went to see S. M. Hitt
and then, getting no satisfaction,
talked with Ed Hillman, himself.
Hillman admitted that the girl had
been wronged, says Lancaster.
"That was not the right way to
treat her," Att'y Lancaster says he
was told. "If they suspected her and
had no evidence against her they
should have discharged the woman
and not held her as they did.
"Please tell Miss Miller that I am
sorry for what happened."
Miss Miller says she thinks he will
be even more sorry if she obtains a
judgment against his store, for Att'y
Lancaster filed suit for $50,000 yes
terday. Lancaster today, after commenting
on the silence of the trust press on
the department store case, explained
the letter from Miss Cohn of Cleve
land. "The husband of Miss Miller was
arrested and convicted of a store
theft in Pittsburgh over a year ago.
He is out on probation. Miss Cohn
heard about this after Miss Miller had
quit her store to work in New York.
She heard that Miss Miller was also
wanted with her husband, who seems
to he a tough character. .So she told
Hillman's that."
FORMER EDITOR OF COLLIER'S
DEFENDS BRANDEIS
New York, Feb. 26. Norman Hap
good, editor of Collier's Weekly at
time of Ballinger-Pinchot contro
versy, today denied emphatically that
there was secrecy about Louis D.
Brandeis acting as attorney for the
paper and as friendly to- Louis Glavis.
Weekly itself published this informa
tion at the time, he told the senate
investigating committee,
NO DECISION IN GRAFT CASE
UNTIL AFTER PRIMARIES
The political significance of the
Rowe-Eaton, salary split graft inves
tigation became apparent today when
Percy Coffin, pres. of the civil service
board which is hearing the case an
nounced that no decision would be
rendered until after the primaries.
The session this morning was dull.
Att'y Malato, for Mrs. Rowe, accused
chief of the dep't of public welfare,
was plainly trying to kill time. Most
of his examination of Mrs. Eaton was
on questions that she had already an
swered. There was no mud slinging.
Malato said that he had had Mrs.
Eaton shadowed and found she visit
ed newspaper offices.
It was expected that Mrs. Rowe
would take the stand this afternoon.
o o
MY DEAR, YOU THIN GIRLS HAD
BETTER HAVE A CARE
New York, Feb. 26. "It's rather a
novel plea," said Magistrate Deuel in
night court, "but your story lacks se
riously in necessary characteristic of
plausibility."
"Er-er," fumbled Frederick Hess, a
prisoner, "I suppose your honor is
right, but I'm telling the truth."
He had been arraigned on com
plaint of Miss Beatrice Dienenhaus
as a masher. She was riding down
town at 8 o'clock in Madison av. car.
At 24th st, she said, prisoner got on,
pushed his way through crowd of
passengers and twice reached down
and pulled her leg.
"It was only once, your honor,"
Hess protested. "It looked like an
umbrella and I reached down to pick
it up."
Hess held him over that his char
acter might be investigated. ,
o o
CHI. GRAIN. Grain sharply low
er. Provisions irregular. May wheat
close, $1.13.
WHOLESALE PRODUCE. Eggs,
22yoc; butter, 33yoC
NEW YORK STOCKS. Opened,
steady, closed weak,
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