OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, March 08, 1916, LAST EDITION, Image 14

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1916-03-08/ed-1/seq-14/

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THE FATAL
Workers Whose Lives Are Not Worth
a Dime, Accojdir to Figures
of Insurance" Firms!
Your life is not worth a dime, not
even a battered-up nickel, according
to insurance companies, if you are
listed among the "FATAL SEVEN,"
which consists of
Steeple jacks,
Aviators,
Soldiers, , v
Dynamite employees,
Jockeys,
Auto racers, t
Grooms who ride the hounds.
Insurance companies keep a closer
tab on deaths than anybody else in
the world. Deaths cost them money,
and to reduce the risks they have
figured things out on a percentage
basis.
They will not insure in some walks
of life. They will take a chance on a
soldier, in time of peace, but a "rider"
in his policy makes it void during
war. The other chaps in the "fatal
seven" they won't insure at all.
There are other "undesirables"
sailors, prison guards, bridge build
ers, ironworkers, players in the mo
vies. Insurance companies charce
high rates when insuring any persons
of these occupations.
Actresses are too temperamental
for traveling and they have to
travel, according to the risk firms.
Distillery workers pay $20 per $1,000
for policies.
atttr v
7
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