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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, April 06, 1916, LAST EDITION, Image 14

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1916-04-06/ed-1/seq-14/

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can enforce Justice when the oper
ators try to get around their agree
ments. And for the eight-hour day,
so I can see a little life outside of a
hole in the ground."
Those three desires were repeated
to me in the cioalcountry, until I
feel safe to say there can never be
complete peace until the three de
mands are granted.
The man who said he wanted to
fight, was in a saloon, drinking beer.
I wondered whether to take him se
riously. Then he invited me to his
house. After ten minutes in that
windy shack, let to him by his em
ployers, I wondered why he didn't
spend ALL his time in the saloon!
He was a very sober fellow.
The liquor question is made much
of in that district. Some of the
miners' union organizers told me a
crusade against alcohol is strongly
backed by mine operators every time
there is a threat of labor troubles.
"It's to give the men something to
blame instead of the boss," said one.
"The operators pick any movement
that has a respectable look and back
it up, trying to make the miners place
their hopes there instead of in the
union.
"Right now there is arv evangelist
going at it hammer and tongs, di
verting the men's minds from the im
pending strike."
"What makes you think it has any
thing to do with the proposed .mine
trouble?" I asked.
"Because all the coal operators are
footing the bills for the revivals."
The whole of life there seems to
center around coal. Even the med
ical profession is not untouched. The
compensation law of Pennsylvania
-o
requires the companies to pay the
medical expenses of an injured miner
to the extent of $25, or for a major
surgical operation, $75.
The miner is to receive 50 per cent
of his wages for the time he is in
capacitated after the first 14 days.
' Well, the companies hire the doc
tors, many of whom, the miners say,
are so solicitous of their employers'
interests as to declare the injured
men capable of working at the end of
the first 14 days, so he receives noth
ing. But why are not these difficulties
attended to by the conciliation board
appointed for that purpose? They
are in the course of time. That is,
a miner complains of injustice of
treatment or unfair discharge and
waits for aa decision several months.
When the decision finally comes,
even though it may declare him in
the right, the miser generally re
ceives no compensation for time lost
it seems as though all the ma
chinery of law and agreement, built
to protect the coal miners, either
clogs or breaks down. He clings to
the last reliance in which he has hope
the union.
o o
SOME DOUBT
"Let me sell your wedding ring, my
dear, and give the money to the Fa
therland!" "All right But where can we get
the most for it at the bank, the
pawn shop or the brass foundry?
Munich Jugend.
o o
TODAY IN ILLINOIS HISTORY
April 6, 1727. A particularly fierce
campaign was being waged between
the Illinois and Fox Indians.
o-
VERY PRACTICAL YOU CAN SEE THAT, LITTLE
"KNICKERS" RATHER CUNNING TOO
are saucy and most awfully pert, but
the pantaloons are very comfortable
BY BETTY BROWN
Blue and yellow well, you may
finish the rhyme if you want to. This for swimming and very becoming to
bathing suit it blue, purplish blue,
the girl who only
'goes near the
and the "knickers" are yellow. They
water.
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