OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, April 18, 1916, LAST EDITION, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1916-04-18/ed-1/seq-1/

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FIELD'S GRADUALLY BUYING THE LOOP
U. S. TROOPS PREPARE FOR SNIPERS
THE DAY BOOK
An Adless Newspaper, Daily Except Sunday
VOL 5, NO. 172 Chicago, Tuesday, April 18, 1916 398g
POLICE CANNOT PLAY
FAIR, SAYS TAYLOR
Speaking on Behalf of Employers Ass'n of 111., "Dud"
Explains That All Protection in Strikes Must Go
to Bosses "To Whoops" the Picketing Angle.
"Safety First" for themselves is
the main thought in the minds of
members of the Employers' Ass'n of
Illinois. This "Safety First" comes
ahead even of neutrality.
This much was discovered today
when Dudley Taylor, commonly
known as "Dud," acting on behalf of
the employers' organization, told the
judiciary committee of the city coun
cil that Chicago's police department
could not act neutral during a strike.
Dudley explained that the employ
ers must naturally get all thciwet
of it Any protection that comes
from the police must go to the em
ployers' side of it
"Strikes are unlawful," he said,
"and the police must necessarily be
against anything that is unlawful. It
matters not if picketing seems
peaceful in character, for it is un
lawful to do anything that is unlaw
ful, and striking is unlawful."
Outside of the expression "unlaw
full," it is hard to say just where the
bosses' representative would "get
off."

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