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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, April 24, 1916, LAST EDITION, Image 9

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1916-04-24/ed-1/seq-9/

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BASEBALL SPORTS OF ALL SORTS BOXING
STANDINGS OF THE CLUBS
National League
W.L. PcL W.L. PcL
Phila... 6 1 .857
Chicago 5 4 .556
SLLouis 5 4 .556
Cin'ti... 5 5 .500
Boston.. 3 3 .500
Brook'n. 2 3 .400
Pittsb'h- 4 6 .400
N.York.. 1 5 .167
Amercan League
W.L. PcL W.L. Pet
N.York. 5.2 .714
Boston. 6 4 .600
SLLouis 5 4 .556
Chicago 6 5 .545
Detroit.. 5 5 .500
Wash'n. 4 5 .444
Clevel'd. 3 5 .375
Phila... 2 6 .250
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
National League. Chicago 3,
Pitsburgh 0; St Louis 2, Cincinnati 1.
American League. Chicago 3, De
troit 2; Cleveland 14, SL Louis 2.
Mr. Weeghman should begin the
preparation of plans for the second
deck on the grandstand of his North
Side park. He will find plenty of
use for it many days during the sea
son now in progress. The new Cub
boss is a forehanded person and it is
probable he has taken care of this
matter, though no definite announce
ment has yet been made.
During the winter it was stated
that the second story would be put
on if the North Side patronage war
ranted such an addition. The way
fans have crowded the park under
weather conditions which have been
bad for baseball has been .something
which undoubtedly has warmed the
hearts of the North Side officials.
Twenty thousand were present the
opening day, Friday's game was
canceled because of cold weather;
rain and chill could not keep away a
goodly gang Saturday, and yester
day, with the thermometer hanging
around the 40 mark 16,000 sat in
the stands and watched the Cubs slip
the first defeat of the season to the
Pittsburgh Pirates.
That is a good reply to those pre
season doubters who wondered if
jhe North Side would supgprft team
as well as the West Side did. If the
crowds have been so good under bad
conditions, with the team clawing
away in the second division, is there
any reason to believe patronage will
not continue heavy when the weath-
er gets warmer and the club begins
to play the brand of ball of which it
is capable.
The spirit on the North Side is dif
ferent from that which prevailed out
west in the last three or four seasons
of the Cubs' residence there. The
fans seem to have declared for a new
deal, with whole-hearted support of
the club so long as the playing of the
team and the deportment of the of
ficials warrant it.
This difference in feeling isn't be
cause of the people in the twa sec
tions of the city. It is based on the
new manner in which the crowds are
being handled and catered to. It is
almost the spirit that surrounds a
college team and is bound to be ben-
.-eficial all around.
The players will show more inter
est in then work if they are backed
in a whole-souled manner, the offi
cials of the club will feel more like
providing proper accommodations
for the spectators, and the latter,
who make the former conditions pos
sible, will also get some of their coin
back in the privilege of watching real
baseball in comfortable surround
ings. In their three home games, two
against the Reds and one against
Pittsburgh, the locals have played
heads-up baseball, alive to every
opening, clawing and fighting to take
advantage of every break that offers.
They have developed a scrapping
spirit which is directed in the right
direction. In the past there has been,
plenty of fighting spirit, but the men
have usually vented it in belligerency
among themselves. Now they are
aiming their fire at the alien clubs
They came from behind m the twe
I Red fames and ovexcameJea

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