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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, May 02, 1916, NOON EDITION, Image 18

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1916-05-02/ed-1/seq-18/

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THE SNOB PARTY
By J. F. Hartigan
"Well, why don't you make your
friends acquainted, then?" asked
Mrs. Plunkett
"My dear mother-an-law, I assure
you I should be perfectly willing."
answered John Stevens, "but you
see my wife won't let me. People in
our position have to live a double ex
istence." "Nonsense, John," interposed
Lydia Stevens, pettishly. "In New
York one does as New York, that's
all. The idea of introducing Millie
Gray to the Lentfields!"
"But why can't it be done?" asked
her mother. "Aren't folks just as
neighborly in New York as at
home?"
"Well, say! That's a good one!"
exclaimed John. "You don't under
stand, mother-in-law. Now it's this
way. Millie and her folks are old
friends, and when we first came to
New York we were thick enough to
gether. But when I made some
money my wife got acquainted with
another set, rich people, my dear
lady, who wouldn't even conde
scend to look once at Millie because
she's a stenographer. Why, Bertram
Lentfield comes into a cool million
at 25, apart from what his father will
leave him"
"Well," said the old lady, "all I can
say is, folks are folks, wherever
you find 'em. And it's my belief that
Bertram and Millie would be tickled
to death with each other."
"But Bertram's always in love any
way," snapped her daughter.
"By George, yes," shouted John.
"Just now he's worrying his moth
er's life out for fear he will be en
tangled with a fast woman. She
came to me in tears about it You
see, she doesn't know we have com
mon friends like the Grays, and she
thinks we are in her set."
"So we are, John," said his wife
angrily. v
"Well, anyway, she came into my
law office I suppose I can repeat
what's common gossip. It appears
that Bertram has to consult another
law firm a good deal, and while he
was there he had their stenographer
do some work for him. Took her
out to supper afterward and seems
bent on 'marrying her."
"How do you know that part,
John?" inquired Lydia.
"His mother told me. She said
there was a fuss at home when Ber-
The Girl Had Never Looked So
Sweet, John Thought
tram wanted to bring the girl there
for a visit. Old Lentfield raved and
fumed and threatened to cut him
off."
"But she may be respectable,
John," protested Mrs. Plunkett
'May be," he admitted. "But any-:

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