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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, May 13, 1916, NOON EDITION, Image 10

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1916-05-13/ed-1/seq-10/

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HUNDRED SHOTS FIRED IN RAID
ON HEARST CIRCULATION ROOM
Several were shot, one probably
fatally, when aC crowd' of chauffeurs
and ex-newspaper sluggers raided
the circulation roomof the Chicago
Examiner early Friday-. Matthew
Foley, boss of the Examiner drivers,
was the most seriously wounded; he
is supposed to be dying with a bullet
in his left lung.
The battle, in which a hundred
shots were fired, was the result of a
bitter feud between drivers for the
Hearst newspaper and chauffeurs for
the Newberry Garage at 1124 S.
Paulina st
Trouble started when a newsboy
selling bulldog editions of the Exam
iner got into a scrap with Harry Mil
ler of 3526 W. 12th St., employed by
the Newberry garage.
The Examiner man hit filler in.
the face with a horseshoe and was
arrested. Friends of Miller were sup
posed to have beaten up the Exam
iner man while the case was pend
ing. A bunch of Examiner drivers
dropped over to Van Buren st and
Wabash av. Wednesday night and
cleaned up Miller and a few of his
friends. No arrests were made.
The feud wound up when, at 2:10
Friday jmorning, five autoloads of
chauffeurs, many of whom had got
their slugging training with the trust
press, sped into the alley back of the
Chicagb Examiner offices
At the door to the circulation de
partment they stopped and opened
fire with their revolvers. Examiner
sluggers didn't hesitate. long to find
guns and they returned the fire.
Several Examiner men were slight
ly wounded before the five autos
started off again and drove west on
Madison sL
Matthew Foley, loop circulation
man for the Examiner, hopped into
an auto and loadedfin several police
men who had run to the battle scene, i
At Madison and Laflin one of the
five autos was overhauled. Foley
jumped from his car into this ma-
chine and grappled with Jack Medni
kow of 1635 W. 12th st Both men
had revolvers and when Officer Pat
rick Lally tried to separate them they
threatened to fire. He drew his gun
and shot Foley through the back.
The men in the car were taken into
custody without trouble. They gave Q
their names at Harry Siff, 1211 S.
Turner av.; Felix Melnik; $2(f S. Cal
ifornia av.; Stanley Zajewski, 1433
W. 16th; David Dubin, 334 W.-13th,
and Abe Schiff, 921-S. Paulina.
Policeman Frank Zink, the- first
one on the scene, says he ran down 7
the alley and a half dozen shots were
fired at him. The bullets seemed to
come -from both sides of the fight
He ran back and sent in a riot call;
twenty-five policemen were rushed to
the Hearst offices.
Capt Morgan Collins of 1st pre
cinct promised rigid investigation of
the affair.
"I won't stand for these shooting
matches in the loop while I am down
here," he declared. "I am going to
go to the bottom of this trouble.
"It seems to be between some
chauffeurs and the Chicago Exam
iner, but I am running down a rumor
that the men were sent over by an
other newspaper."
o o
ALCIES MAY FORCE GREECE TO
GIVE UP RAILWAY
Berlin, via Wireless to Sayville.
The allies have determined to use
force if necessary to obtain the use
of Greek railways for the transporta
tion of Serbian troops from Corfu to
Salonika, -according to an official
statement published in the Petrograd
newspapers, of May 5. v
The Russian press bureau stated
that Greece refused permission, fear
ing Germany would consider use of
railway an unneutral act- and also
out of fear of epidemics resulting
from the transportation of the Serbs,

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