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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, May 18, 1916, NOON EDITION, Image 20

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1916-05-18/ed-1/seq-20/

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THE GOLDEN HOPE
By George Elmer Cobb
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."Where. did you get me?".
"Outside of the Dew Drop, tossing
your money to a "crowd of loafers
and bragging that you had come
back to preville to show people how
to mine."
"That's me!" observed Rufe Glid
den, sitting up in bed ami string cu
riously about the dainty, orderly
room he was in. "And you took me
"in, the Good Samaritan, eh?"
"I was sorry for you, Rufe, and I
didn't forget that "you gave me my
grub stake five years ago, when you
left Oreville."
"Forget that!"
"I never have. The claim, low
grade as it is, has enabled me to send
a living back to the family in the
east, and when my wife died I
brought my daughter and the little
ones out here. I've saved ' $2,000.
When I double that I'm going back
to the old home town, buy out a mod
est little business and educate the
kids. Breakfast is ready." "
"I've not got much appetite," said
Rufe, and he looked around as he
said it. Then, left to himself, he got
up and dressed. His first move was
to se,arch his coat. Yes, there was
a flask "for the morning swig." He
regarded the fiery stuff gloatingly.
Then his eye chanced to rest upon
the bureau cover. A dozen dainty
female toilet accessories showed. A
delicately embroidered sachet sent
out a sweet perfume. Beyond the
closet door a light, pretty dress
showed. The man observed. An odor
of sanctity seemed to appeal to his
manliness.
"His daughter's room," he mut
tered. "She gave it up to me! Bah!
They ought to have stowed me in
some dog kennel! Through!"
He gave the liquor flask a violent
fling through the open window. He
watched it shatter to pieces on the
ground. Then he went down stairs. ,
Uohn War.d was reading a newspaper.
"See here, oltl friend, give me a
scrap of paper and a pencil, will
you?"
"After breakfast, yes."
"No, now," insisted Rufe peremp
torily. His hand was shaking, as,
the articles provided, he dashed off
a rapid scrawl.
"There," he said, signing his name
to the pledge, "the first I ever gave,
Rufe and Ward Visited the Aban
doned Diggings -
and the last, for it shall last for all
time. Two witnesses, you and "
"My daughter, Mr. Glidden," inter
rupted Ward, courteously and grave
ly, as a charming young girl entered
the room. "Rose, you have heard me
speak 'of my best friend."
"Many a time, father," was the
earnest reply, and the glance of her
grateful, welcoming eyes sent alhrill
tlirough the object of her interest,
and as well made him shamefaced,

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