OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, May 31, 1916, NOON EDITION, Image 19

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1916-05-31/ed-1/seq-19/

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.Deane vaunted somehow made a se
rious impression on ' the mind of
Grace. She noted that it was shared
by Lester, although the latter made
no comment, but his face was pity
ing as the unfortunate young man
from the creek settlement went on
his unsteady way, turned into a
wooded lot just beyond the Waldron
grounds, and for the time being at
-Jeast gave up the task of finding' his
'way home by lying down under a
bush and forgetting life and its ac
tivities in sodden slumber.
Grace was preoccupied all after
noon. J3he avoided Deane and he no
ticed it Hers was a tender heart.
Memory; too, had been busy. She
.recalled a cousin who had fallen a
victim to the lure of the wine cup
at the acme of ambition, always a
prief with the devoted relatives who
-had seen his promised life cut short.
"I wish you would remain a little
. aiier tne otners leave, sue said to
tester, ana ne was in tne seventh
heaven -of delight at the words. Then
when the. others had departed she
came to the , retired garden seat
where he unobtrusively awaited her.
She was embarrassed and flushed as
she satdown beside him. '
, "You 'are a good friend, Mr. Les
ter," she said, "and I felt you would
b'e glad to help me out of some trou
blesome anxieties."
"You have but to command me,"
assured Lester loyally. .
"The poor unfortunate who passed
by here upon whom Mr. Deane had
played the sorry trick you remem
ber him?"
Lester bowed in asseht At that j
moment he decided that Deane stock
was at a low appraisement with Miss
Grace Waldron.
"Coraewith me, please," continued
Grace. "The poor fellow is lying In
the bushes just beyond here."
She led the Way past the confines
of the home grounds. As they near
ed some bushes, the prone figure of
the wretched inebriate came into
yiew.
"He is young and has not a hard'
face," pursued Grace, and her tender
sympathy touched a responsive
cHord in the heart of Lester. "He
has a mother, probably. They have
disfigured him with what they call
their joking ways. Mr. Lester, I
want you to take care of this man
and send him home respectable look
ing and sober."
"You can trust me willingly to do
that," responded Lester heartily.
Then Grace, blushing at her own te
merity, darted away and as Lester
approached the prostrate man the
latter sat up abruptly.
"Say, mister," he spoke clearly, to
the profound amazement of Lester,
"who is that young lady?"
"She is Miss Grace Waldron," re
plied Lester without reflection.
"And yours?"
"Boyd Lester."
"I want to remember them," said
the young fellow, a slight huskiness
in his voice. "I noticed this just
now for the first time." He laughed
half shamefacedly, and he fumbled'
at his mustache.
"Conje with me and I will see to
mehding that," pledged Lester, and
hedid not hesitate to take the man
to his room, provide razor and toilet
accessories, and sent him home with
a grateful, though rather wretched
face.
Lester made only one reference
after that to the episode and that
was to report his action to Grace in
accordance with her request to him.
He received a sweet friendly smile, a
glance of rare approval from those
telltale eyes. Then a few days be
fore the 'judgeship election were bus
ily spent
It was a heated contest, and the
most expert politicians could not
predict the outcome with any con
fidence. ,
Votes were sought after eagerly.
About four o'clock-in the afternoon
a wagon drove up hied with denizens
of the creek district- A man jumped
out and approached Lester.

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