OCR Interpretation


The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, June 08, 1916, LAST EDITION, Image 18

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1916-06-08/ed-1/seq-18/

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THE RIDE TO SHILOH
By George Munsort
"Hello, boys! Which of you'll hitch
up the dogs and take Miss "Arline to
Shiloh?"
The lumbermen stopped dancing.
Half a dozen turned to look at the
speaker. He was the camp cook.
They sprang forward, not under
standing, but eager for the chance.
Arline was the only child of Joe
Bonner, the boss of a big section on
the Northern claim and now 50 miles
away in the woods. Arline was the
adored of all the lumbermen, most
of, whom dreamed of the time when
they, could ask her t6 marry them.
Big Jim O'Grady, Lean Mike, little
Bienainie, the Frenchman, all loved
Arline. She had flirted with each of
them as only a girl of 18 can flirt;
but none of them knew who was the
favored one. .
Each, including little Bienaime,
was sure that it could not be Bien
aime. Only the day before Arline
had sent the boy away with a long
face when he dared to remind her of
a promised dance. She had sneered
at his size in the presence of the oth
ers; and they had laughed at him.
"It's it's smallpox!" explained the
cook in a terrified whisper.
Every man halted. The dread dis
ease was epidemic around them in
bnlf a dozen camps, but so far this
one had escaped. All loved Arline,
but nobody was going to drive thirty
miles with an infected girl in a dog
sleigh. Little Bienaime came forward. He
was shaking and as white as a sheet,
but he came forward.
"I will take her," he said, and was
conscious that, though tie music
had started again, nobody was pay
ing any attention to it
"Don't be a fool, Bienaime," said
Big Jim and Lean Mike together.
"Want to die, hey?"
"I go if I die," said Bienaime.
. He went out in the direction of the
boss shack. He knocked, aud re
ceiving no answer, went in, to jind
Arline huddled over the stove, the
fear of death on her face, where the
signs of the dread disease where1 al
ready evident
"What do you want?" she asked,
looking up at him.
"I take you to Shiloh, to the doc
tor," answered the lilttle Frenchman.
"Keep back, you fool. Haven't you
more sense?" demanded the girl bit-
Huddled Over the Stove
terly. "I reckon you don't want to
die, do you?"
"I take you to Shiloh," repeated
the Frenchman obstinately.
"Keep back! What about the other
boys? Wouldn't they come? I
thought" she gulped, "maybe Big
Jim would take me. He ought to,
heaven knows."
Bienaime's heart leaped. So it was
Big Jim she loved. Then he gritted
his teeth.

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