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The day book. (Chicago, Ill.) 1911-1917, August 31, 1916, LAST EDITION, Image 4

Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045487/1916-08-31/ed-1/seq-4/

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WILSON HOPEFUL, .GOES TO CAP
ITOL AGAIN CALLS EMPLOYES
TO PARLEY
Washington, Aug. 31. Continu
ing his driving tactics to -force con
gressional action that -will avert the
threatened railroad strike, Pres. Wil
son appeared again in person at the
capitoL He told congressjeaders
that information was at hand show
ing a strike could be prevented by
immediate action on the 8-hour pro
posal suggested to the joint session
of congress Tuesday.
Upon leaving the capitol the pres
ident said:
"I have just been keeping in touch
with things to see if they are mov
ing. And they are moving. I think
we are progressing satisfactorily."
He requested hearings be speeded
rp as much as possible and that ac
tion toward the passage of legislation
covering the application or tne s
hour day to railroad operation, be
pushedVthrough by Saturday.
Pres. Wilson looked worn and hag
gard as he drove to the capitol.
The president called for a confer
ence with the brotherhood leaders at
2 o'clock this afternoon.
It is understood the conference
with the brotherhood will be final
and personal appeal to rescind the
order for a general walkout on Labor
day.
While some opposition was expect
ed to an 8-hour law in certain quar
ters, senate leaders declared they
"will so put case before' country that
no senator will dare to attempt to
prevent passage of measure later
than tomorrow afternoon by debate."
Some senators who were frankiy
dubious yesterday flatly stated to
day that 8-hour proposition "will be
on s(atute books by Saturday even
ing." Another over-night development
wa generally believed to have made
almostcertain the passage of the 8
hour proposition and of the proposal
of president that he be empowered to 1
compel trainmeiyto operate roads "in
event of military necessity."
o o
HOLDEN SAYS ROADS CAN fcEEP
SERVICE UP IF PROTECTED
Pres. Hale Holden'of the Burling
ton' issued a statement announcing
that the railways of the middle west
would be able to maintain services if l
give nprotection.
As Holden has been acting-as
spokesman for the- railroad presi
dents both- liere and in Washington,
his statement was regarded as the
expression of the entire body of Chi
cago railroad presidents. Holden's
statement in part follows:
"If the, strike occurs the railroads
of this territory, at least in my opin
ion, will be able to maintain suffi
cient service to relieve the public
wants, although there will be un
doubtedly public inconveniences.
The extent to which service can be
rndered will largely depend upon
the enforcement of law for keeping
the peace. There are emn who are
willing to work and man the trains if
the public permits them to, do so
through the enforcement of the law.
I do not believe there will he a com
plete tie-up of service."
sfL E. Byron, vice pres. and sup't of
the Burlington, declared that, con
trary to reports, no strikebreakerr
have beenhired by the .Burlington.
o o
CHI. CHILDREN MUST HAVE A
HEALTH CERTIFICATE TO
ENTER SCHOOLS -
A health certificate showing. the
child to be free from all contagious
or infectious diseases will be de
manded from every boy andV girl
seeking to enroll in Chicago's pub- ,
lie scbols which open next .week.
This notice was sent out by the
board of education today, following
the sugegstion of Dr. John D. Rob
ertson, com'r of health, who is seek
ing to check the spread of infantile -paralysis.
Opening of kindergarten
schools has been postponed to OcttH
ber first.

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